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93FANCIED
182FANCY
291FAR
146FARE
97FASHION
115FATE
897FATHER
173FATTO
125FAULT
156FEAR
258FEEL
400FEELING
152FEET
96FELICIDAD
95FELIZ
204FELL
372FELLOW
423FELT
97FERDISHENKO
112FEVER
205FEW
128FIFTEEN
109FIFTY
124FIGURE
118FIL
117FILIPPOVITCH
401FIN
111FINAL
113FINALLY
104FINALMENTE
322FIND
120FINE
160FINGER
97FINISHED
108FINO
312FIODOR
486FIODOROVITCH
211FIRE
101FIRMLY
739FIRST
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320FIVE
115FIXED
108FLASH
185FLAT
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162FLOOR
98FLUNG
142FLUSH
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259FOLLOW
162FOND
269FOOL
123FOOT
105FORCE
149FORGET
266FORGIVE
157FORGOTTEN
148FORM
205FORMA
95FORMER
135FORSE
114FORTUNE
96FORTY
155FORWARD
120FOSSE
323FOUND
224FOUR
138FRANCE
167FREE
113FREEDOM
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92FRENCHMAN
132FRENTE
94FRESH
576FRIEND
206FRIGHTEN
2200FROM
92FRONT
428FUE
223FUERA
123FUERZA
130FUERZAS
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217FULL
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1. Dostoevsky. Notes from the Underground (English. Записки из подполья). Part II. Chapter X
Входимость: 1. Размер: 12кб.
Часть текста: the crack at Liza. She was sitting on the ground with her head leaning against the bed, and must have been crying. But she did not go away, and that irritated me. This time she understood it all. I had insulted her finally, but... there's no need to describe it. She realised that my outburst of passion had been simply revenge, a fresh humiliation, and that to my earlier, almost causeless hatred was added now a PERSONAL HATRED, born of envy.... Though I do not maintain positively that she understood all this distinctly; but she certainly did fully understand that I was a despicable man, and what was worse, incapable of loving her. I know I shall be told that this is incredible--but it is incredible to be as spiteful and stupid as I was; it may be added that it was strange I should not love her, or at any rate, appreciate her love. Why is it strange? In the first place, by then I was incapable of love, for I repeat, with me loving meant tyrannising and showing my moral superiority. I have never in my life been able to imagine any other sort of love, and have nowadays come to the point of sometimes thinking that love really consists in the right-- freely given by the beloved object--to tyrannise over her. Even in my underground dreams I did not imagine love except as a struggle. I began it always with hatred and ended it with moral subjugation, and afterwards I never knew what to do with the subjugated object. And what is there to wonder at in that, since I had succeeded in so corrupting myself, since I was so out ...
2. Dostoevsky. Crime and Punishment (English. Преступление и наказание). Part six. Chapter Seven
Входимость: 1. Размер: 22кб.
Часть текста: servant happened to be out. At first Pulcheria Alexandrovna was speechless with joy and surprise; then she took him by the hand and drew him into the room. "Here you are!" she began, faltering with joy. "Don't be angry with me, Rodya, for welcoming you so foolishly with tears: I am laughing not crying. Did you think I was crying? No, I am delighted, but I've got into such a stupid habit of shedding tears. I've been like that ever since your father's death. I cry for anything. Sit down, dear boy, you must be tired; I see you are. Ah, how muddy you are." "I was in the rain yesterday, mother...." Raskolnikov began. "No, no," Pulcheria Alexandrovna hurriedly interrupted, "you thought I was going to cross-question you in the womanish way I used to; don't be anxious, I understand, I understand it all: now I've learned the ways here an truly I see for myself that they are better. I've made up my mind once for all: how could I understand your plans and expect you to give an account of them? God knows what concerns and plans you may have, or what ideas you are hatching; so it's not for me to keep nudging your elbow, asking you what you are thinking about. But, my goodness! why am I running to and fro as though I were crazy...? I am...
3. Dostoevsky. Crime and Punishment (English. Преступление и наказание). Part one. Chapter Seven
Входимость: 1. Размер: 28кб.
Часть текста: he began, trying to speak easily, but his voice would not obey him, it broke and shook. "I have come... I have brought something... but we'd better come in... to the light...." And leaving her, he passed straight into the room uninvited. The old woman ran after him; her tongue was unloosed. "Good heavens! What it is? Who is it? What do you want?" "Why, Alyona Ivanovna, you know me... Raskolnikov... here, I brought you the pledge I promised the other day..." and he held out the pledge. The old woman glanced for a moment at the pledge, but at once stared in the eyes of her uninvited visitor. She looked intently, maliciously and mistrustfully. A minute passed; he even fancied something like a sneer in her eyes, as though she had already guessed everything. He felt that he was losing his head, that he was almost frightened, so frightened that if she were to look like that and not say a word for another half minute, he thought he would have run away from her. "Why do you look at me as though you did not know me?" he said suddenly, also with malice. "Take it if you like, if not I'll go elsewhere, I am in a hurry." He had not even thought of saying this, but it was suddenly said of itself. The old woman recovered herself, and her visitor's resolute tone evidently restored her confidence. "But why, my good sir, all of a minute.... What is it?" she asked, looking at the pledge. "The silver cigarette case; I spoke of it last time, you know." She held out her hand. "But how pale you are, to be sure... and your hands are trembling too? Have you been bathing, or what?" "Fever," he answered abruptly. "You can't help getting pale... if you've nothing to eat," he added, with difficulty articulating the words. His strength was failing him again. But his answer sounded like the truth; the old woman took the pledge. "What is it?" she asked once more, scanning...
4. Dostoevsky. Crime and Punishment (English. Преступление и наказание). Part three. Chapter One
Входимость: 1. Размер: 32кб.
Часть текста: was addressing to his mother and sister, took them both by the hand and for a minute or two gazed from one to the other without speaking. His mother was alarmed by his expression. It revealed an emotion agonisingly poignant, and at the same time something immovable, almost insane. Pulcheria Alexandrovna began to cry. Avdotya Romanovna was pale; her hand trembled in her brother's. "Go home... with him," he said in a broken voice, pointing to Razumihin, "good-bye till to-morrow; to-morrow everything... Is it long since you arrived?" "This evening, Rodya," answered Pulcheria Alexandrovna, "the train was awfully late. But, Rodya, nothing would induce me to leave you now! I will spend the night here, near you..." "Don't torture me!" he said with a gesture of irritation. "I will stay with him," cried Razumihin, "I won't leave him for a moment. Bother all my visitors! Let them rage to their hearts' content! My uncle is presiding there." "How, how can I thank you!" Pulcheria Alexandrovna was beginning, once more pressing Razumihin's hands, but Raskolnikov interrupted her again. "I can't have it! I can't have it!" he repeated irritably, "don't worry me! Enough, go...
5. Dostoevsky. The Possessed (English. Бесы). Part II. Chapter VIII. Ivan the Tsarevitch
Входимость: 1. Размер: 26кб.
Часть текста: about, left everything, and two minutes later was flying after the other two. On the way he remembered a short cut to Filipov's house. He rushed along it, up to his knees in mud, and did in fact arrive at the very moment when Stavrogin and Kirillov were coming in at the gate. “You here already?” observed Kirillov. “That's good. Come in.” “How is it you told us you lived alone,” asked Stavrogin, passing a boiling samovar in the passage. “You will see directly who it is I live with,” muttered Kirillov. “Go in.” They had hardly entered when Verhovensky at once took out of his pocket the anonymous letter he had taken from Lembke, and laid it before Stavrogin. They all then sat down. Stavrogin read the letter in silence. “Well?” he asked. “That scoundrel will do as he writes,” Verhovensky explained. “So, as he is under your control, tell me how to act. I assure you he may go to Lembke to-morrow.” “Well, let him go.” “Let him go! And when we can prevent him, too!” “You are mistaken. He is not dependent on me. Besides, I don't care; he doesn't threaten me in any way; he only threatens you.” “You too.” “I don't think so.” “But there are other people who may not spare you. Surely you understand that? Listen, Stavrogin. This is only playing with words. Surely you don't grudge the money?” “Why, would it cost money?” “It certainly would; two thousand or at least fifteen hundred. Give it to me to-morrow or even to-day, and to-morrow evening I'll send him to Petersburg for you. That's just what he wants. If you like, he can take Marya Timofyevna. Note that.” There was something distracted about him. He spoke, as it were, without caution, and he did not reflect on his words. Stavrogin watched him, wondering. “I've no reason to send...

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