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Показаны лучшие 100 слов (из 522).
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102GAIN
108GAME
57GANAS
378GANIA
165GARDEN
120GATE
60GATHERED
290GAVE
61GAVRILA
66GAZE
127GAZED
87GAZING
905GENERAL
267GENERALE
73GENERALLY
73GENERATION
90GENEROUS
209GENTE
75GENTLE
205GENTLEMAN
416GENTLEMEN
75GENUINE
187GERMAN
146GESTO
71GESTURE
520GET
179GETTING
63GIFT
79GIORNO
386GIRL
551GIVE
225GIVEN
120GIVING
180GLAD
123GLANCE
79GLANCED
178GLASS
64GLEAM
474GLI
99GLOOMY
677GOD
78GOES
546GOING
109GOLD
830GOLJADKIN
84GOLPE
69GOLPES
803GOLYADKIN
267GONE
847GOOD
97GOODNESS
74GOSSIP
461GOT
88GOVERNMENT
98GOVERNOR
103GRACIA
65GRADO
65GRADUALLY
308GRAN
111GRAND
121GRANDE
109GRANDES
126GRANDFATHER
136GRANDMOTHER
67GRANT
57GRASP
65GRATEFUL
59GRATITUDE
112GRAVE
646GREAT
70GREATER
93GREATEST
92GREATLY
85GREEN
113GREW
84GREY
91GRIEF
103GRIER
226GRIEUX
191GRIGORI
193GRIGORY
227GRITO
95GRITOS
147GROUND
66GROUP
78GROW
75GROWING
109GROWN
415GRUCHEGNKA
70GRUPO
367GRUSHENKA
93GUARD
56GUARDO
73GUESS
105GUESSED
145GUEST
111GUILTY
165GULDEN
91GUSTA
73GUSTO

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по слову GOT

1. Dostoevsky. The Possessed (English. Бесы). Part I. Chapter V. The subtle serpent
Входимость: 12. Размер: 113кб.
Часть текста: at once that it's the highest society,” cried Marya Timofyevna, clapping her hands, ecstatically preparing herself to listen to a conversation in French. Varvara Petrovna stared at her almost in dismay. We all sat in silence, waiting to see how it would end. Shatov did not lift up his head, and Stepan Trofimovitch was overwhelmed with confusion as though it were all his fault; the perspiration stood out on his temples. I glanced at Liza (she was sitting in the corner almost beside Shatov). Her eyes darted keenly from Varvara Petrovna to the cripple and back again; her lips were drawn into a smile, but not a pleasant one. Varvara Petrovna saw that smile. Meanwhile Marya Timofyevna was absolutely transported. With evident enjoyment and without a trace of embarrassment she stared at Varvara Petrovna's beautiful drawing-room—the furniture, the carpets, the pictures on the walls, the old-fashioned painted ceiling, the great bronze crucifix in the corner, the china lamp, the albums, ...
2. Dostoevsky. Crime and Punishment (English. Преступление и наказание). Part six. Chapter One
Входимость: 6. Размер: 23кб.
Часть текста: apathy, which came upon him as a reaction from his previous terror and might be compared with the abnormal insensibility, sometimes seen in the dying. He seemed to be trying in that latter stage to escape from a full and clear understanding of his position. Certain essential facts which required immediate consideration were particularly irksome to him. How glad he would have been to be free from some cares, the neglect of which would have threatened him with complete, inevitable ruin. He was particularly worried about Svidrigailov, he might be said to be permanently thinking of Svidrigailov. From the time of Svidrigailov's too menacing and unmistakable words in Sonia's room at the moment of Katerina Ivanovna's death, the normal working of his mind seemed to break down. But although this new fact caused him extreme uneasiness, Raskolnikov was in no hurry for an explanation of it. At times, finding himself in a solitary and remote part of the town, in some wretched eating-house, sitting alone lost in thought, hardly knowing how he had come there, he suddenly thought of Svidrigailov. He recognised suddenly, clearly, and with dismay that he ought at once to come to an understanding with that man and to make what terms he could. Walking outside the city gates one day, ...
3. Dostoevsky. The Possessed (English. Бесы). Part III. Chapter V. A wanderer
Входимость: 8. Размер: 76кб.
Часть текста: What that everything was, no one but he could say. Of course he would have achieved nothing, and would have simply betrayed himself. He had no proofs whatever with which to convict the perpetrators of the crime, and, indeed, he had nothing but vague conjectures to go upon, though to him they amounted to complete certainty. But he was ready to ruin himself if he could only “crush the scoundrels”—his own words. Pyotr Stepanovitch had guessed fairly correctly at this impulse in him, and he knew himself that he was risking a great deal in putting off the execution of his new awful project till next day. On his side there was, as usual, great self-confidence and contempt for all these “wretched creatures” and for Shatov in particular. He had for years despised Shatov for his “whining idiocy,” as he had expressed it in former days abroad, and he was absolutely confident that he could deal with such a guileless creature, that is, keep an eye on him all that day, and put a check on him at the first sign of danger. Yet what saved “the scoundrels” for a short time was something quite unexpected which they had not foreseen. . . . Towards eight o'clock in the evening (at the very time when the quintet was meeting at Erkel's, and waiting in indignation and excitement for Pyotr Stepanovitch) Shatov was lying in the dark on his bed with a headache and a slight chill; he was tortured by uncertainty, he was angry, he kept making up his mind, and could not make it up finally, and felt, with a curse, that it would all lead to nothing. Gradually he sank into a brief doze and had something like a nightmare. He dreamt...
4. Dostoevsky. The Brothers Karamazov (English. Братья Карамазовы). Part IV. Book XI. Ivan. Chapter 9.The Devil. Ivan"s Nightmare
Входимость: 9. Размер: 47кб.
Часть текста: eve of an attack of brain fever. Though his health had long been affected, it had offered a stubborn resistance to the fever which in the end gained complete mastery over it. Though I know nothing of medicine, I venture to hazard the suggestion that he really had perhaps, by a terrible effort of will, succeeded in delaying the attack for a time, hoping, of course, to check it completely. He knew that he was unwell, but he loathed the thought of being ill at that fatal time, at the approaching crisis in his life, when he needed to have all his wits about him, to say what he had to say boldly and resolutely and "to justify himself to himself." He had, however, consulted the new doctor, who had been brought from Moscow by a fantastic notion of Katerina Ivanovna's to which I have referred already. After listening to him and examining him the doctor came to the conclusion that he was actually suffering from some disorder of the brain, and was not at all surprised by an admission which Ivan had reluctantly made him. "Hallucinations ...
5. Dostoevsky. The Possessed (English. Бесы). Part III. Chapter I. The fete—first part
Входимость: 6. Размер: 70кб.
Часть текста: peculiar was the significance Yulia Mihailovna attached to it. Alas! up to the last moment she was blind and had no inkling of the state of public feeling. No one believed at last that the festive day would pass without some tremendous scandal, some “catastrophe” as some people expressed it, rubbing their hands in anticipation. Many people, it is true, tried to assume a frowning and diplomatic countenance; but, speaking generally, every Russian is inordinately delighted at any public scandal and disorder. It is true that we did feel something much more serious than the mere craving for a scandal: there was a general feeling of irritation, a feeling of implacable resentment; every one seemed thoroughly disgusted with everything. A kind of bewildered cynicism, a forced, as it were, strained cynicism was predominant in every one. The only people who were free from bewilderment were the ladies, and they were clear on only one point:' their remorseless detestation of Yulia Mihailovna. Ladies of all shades of opinion were agreed in this. And she, poor dear, had no suspicion; up to the last hour she was persuaded that she was “surrounded by followers,” and that they were still “fanatically devoted to her.” I have already hinted that some low fellows of different sorts had made their appearance amongst us. In turbulent times of upheaval or transition low characters always come to the front everywhere. I am not speaking now of the so-called “advanced” people who are always in a hurry to be in advance of every one else (their absorbing anxiety) and who always have some more or less definite, though often very stupid, aim. No, I am speaking only of the riff-raff. In ...

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