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272IBA
845IDEA
105IDEAL
112IDIOT
140IDO
131IGLESIA
82IGNORO
79IGUAL
69IKON
81ILITCH
160ILIUCHA
272ILL
134ILLNESS
172ILUSHA
101ILYITCH
71IMAGE
60IMAGINACION
188IMAGINE
99IMAGINED
93IMBECIL
148IMMEDIATELY
67IMMENSE
73IMPATIENCE
61IMPATIENT
67IMPATIENTLY
172IMPORTA
72IMPORTANCE
98IMPORTANCIA
158IMPORTANT
106IMPORTANTE
145IMPOSIBLE
194IMPOSSIBLE
108IMPRESION
68IMPRESSED
154IMPRESSION
79IMPULSE
64INCAPABLE
75INCAPAZ
108INCIDENT
62INCLINO
600INCLUSO
371INDEED
78INDIGNACION
94INDIGNATION
62INDISPENSABLE
83INFANCIA
89INFINE
116INFLUENCE
83INFORMATION
96INFORMED
73INJURED
70INMOVIL
91INNOCENT
60INQUIETA
95INQUIETUD
83INQUIRED
62INQUIRY
108INSIST
178INSTANCE
141INSTANT
170INSTANTE
114INSTANTLY
126INSTEAD
89INSTRUCCION
214INSULT
64INSULTING
71INTELIGENCIA
97INTELIGENTE
75INTELLIGENCE
70INTELLIGENT
101INTENCION
76INTEND
84INTENSE
107INTENTION
106INTENTLY
79INTERES
177INTEREST
95INTERESTED
114INTERESTING
68INTERIOR
76INTERRUMPIO
127INTERRUPTED
88INTERVIEW
1021INTO
79INTORNO
63INTRIGUE
77INVALID
84INVITED
82IRA
104IRE
61IRRESISTIBLE
68IRRITABLE
64IRRITATED
161ISN
347ITS
137ITSELF
1296IVAN
562IVANOVITCH
925IVANOVNA
78IZQUIERDA

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по слову INDUCE

1. Dostoevsky. A Raw Youth (English. Подросток). Part III. Chapter X
Входимость: 1. Размер: 49кб.
Часть текста: let slip an allusion. It appeared that Anna Andreyevna had ventured at last on the most audacious step that could be imagined in her position; she certainly had a will of her own! On the pretext of his health the old prince had been in the nick of time carried off to Tsarskoe Syelo so that the news of his approaching marriage with Anna Andreyevna might not be spread abroad, but might for the time be stifled, so to say, in embryo, yet the feeble old man, with whom one could do anything else, would not on any consideration have consented to give up his idea and jilt Anna Andreyevna, who had made him an offer. On this subject he was a paragon of chivalry, so that he might sooner or later bestir himself and suddenly proceed to carry out his intentions with that irresistible force which is so very frequently met with in weak characters, for they often have a line beyond which they cannot be driven. Moreover, he fully recognised the delicacy of the position of Anna Andreyevna, for whom he had an unbounded respect; he was quite alive to the possibility of rumours, of gibes, of injurious gossip. The only thing that checked him and kept him quiet for the time was that Katerina Nikolaevna had never once allowed herself to drop the faintest hint reflecting on Anna Andreyevna in his presence, or to raise the faintest objection to his intention of marrying her; on the contrary, she showed the greatest cordiality and every attention to her father's fiancee. In this way Anna Andreyevna was placed in an extremely awkward position, perceiving with her subtle feminine instinct that she would wound all the old prince's tenderest feelings, and would arouse his distrust and even, perhaps, his indignation by the slightest criticism of Katerina Nikolaevna, whom he worshipped, too, and now more than ever just because she had so graciously and dutifully consented to his marriage. And so for ...
2. Dostoevsky. The Brothers Karamazov (English. Братья Карамазовы). Part II. Book IV. Lacerations. Chapter 2.At His Father"s
Входимость: 1. Размер: 12кб.
Часть текста: Alyosha went in. The old man was sitting alone at the table wearing slippers and a little old overcoat. He was amusing himself by looking through some accounts, rather inattentively however. He was quite alone in the house, for Smerdyakov too had gone out marketing. Though he had got up early and was trying to put a bold face on it, he looked tired and weak. His forehead, upon which huge purple bruises had come out during the night, was bandaged with a red handkerchief; his nose too was swollen terribly in the night, and some smaller bruises covered it in patches, giving his whole face a peculiarly spiteful and irritable look. The old man was aware of this, and turned a hostile glance on Alyosha as he came in. "The coffee is cold," he cried harshly; "I won't offer you any. I've ordered nothing but a Lenten fish soup to-day, and I don't invite anyone to share it. Why have you come?" "To find out how you are," said Alyosha. "Yes. Besides, I told you to come yesterday. It's all of no consequence. You need not have troubled. But I knew you'd come poking in directly." He said this with almost hostile feeling. At the same time he got up and looked anxiously in the looking-glass (perhaps for the...
3. Dostoevsky. A Raw Youth (English. Подросток). Part III. Chapter XIII
Входимость: 1. Размер: 32кб.
Часть текста: XIII CHAPTER XIII CONCLUSION 1 Almost six months have passed since that scene, much has happened, much has completely changed, and a new life has begun for me since then. . . . But I must settle what I have left doubtful in my story. To me at least, the first question at the time, and long afterwards was: how Versilov could have brought himself to act in concert with a man like Lambert, and what were his objects in doing so? Little by little, I have arrived at an explanation of a sort; to my thinking, at those moments, that is, all that last day and the day before, Versilov can have had no definite aim, and I believe, indeed, he did not reflect on the matter at all, but acted under the influence of a whirlwind of conflicting emotions. But the theory of actual madness I cannot accept, especially as he is not in the least mad now. But the "second self" I do accept unquestionably. What is a second self exactly? The second self, according to a medical book, written by an expert, which I purposely read afterwards, is nothing else than the first stage of serious mental derangement,...
4. Dostoevsky. A Raw Youth (English. Подросток). Part I. Chapter VII
Входимость: 1. Размер: 35кб.
Часть текста: and of my realizing distinctly that I had not come off with flying colours downstairs. Even Tatyana Pavlovna's spiteful abuse of me struck me as funny and amusing and did not anger me at all. Probably all this was because I had anyway broken my chains and for the first time felt myself free. I felt, too, that I had weakened my position: how I was to act in regard to the letter about the inheritance was more obscure than ever. Now it would be certainly taken for granted that I was revenging myself on Versilov. But while all this discussion was going on downstairs I had made up my mind to submit the question of the letter to an impartial outsider and to appeal to Vassin for his decision, or, failing Vassin, to take it to some one else. I had already made up my mind to whom. I would go to see Vassin once, for that occasion only, I thought to myself, and then--then I would vanish for a long while, for some months, from the sight of all, especially of Vassin. Only my mother and sister I might...
5. Dostoevsky. The Possessed (English. Бесы). Part I. Chapter II. Prince harry. Matchmaking
Входимость: 1. Размер: 96кб.
Часть текста: Varvara Petrovna, so that the child grew up entirely in his mother's care. To do Stepan Trofimovitch justice, he knew how to win his pupil's heart. The whole secret of this lay in the fact that he was a child himself. I was not there in those days, and he continually felt the want of a real friend. He did not hesitate to make a friend of this little creature as soon as he had grown a little older. It somehow came to pass quite naturally that there seemed to be no discrepancy of age between them. More than once he awaked his ten- or eleven-year-old friend at night, simply to pour out his wounded feelings and weep before him, or to tell him some family secret, without realising that this was an outrageous proceeding. They threw themselves into each other's arms and wept. The boy knew that his mother loved him very much, but I doubt whether he cared much for her. She talked little to him and did not often interfere with him, but he was always morbidly conscious of her intent, searching eyes fixed upon him. Yet the mother confided his whole instruction and moral education to Stepan Trofimovitch. At that time her faith in him was unshaken. One can't help believing that the tutor had rather a bad influence on his pupil's nerves. When at sixteen he was taken to a lyceum he was fragile-looking and pale, strangely quiet and dreamy. (Later on he was distinguished by great physical strength.) One must assume too that the friends went on weeping at night, throwing themselves in each other's arms, though their tears were not always due to domestic difficulties. Stepan Trofimovitch succeeded in reaching the deepest chords in his pupil's heart, and had aroused in him a vague sensation of that eternal, sacred yearning which some ...

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