Cлова на букву "J"


А Б В Г Д Е Ж З И Й К Л М Н О П Р С Т У Ф Х Ц Ч Ш Щ Э Ю Я
0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Поиск  

Показаны лучшие 100 слов (из 171).
Чтобы посмотреть все варианты, нажмите

 Кол-во Слово
26JACKET
30JACKSON
4JACOB
12JACQUES
107JAK
6JALOUSIE
7JAM
19JAMAIS
187JAMAS
7JAME
109JARDIN
5JASPER
4JAUNTILY
10JAUNTY
15JAW
105JEALOUS
57JEALOUSY
22JEAN
42JEER
23JEERING
5JELLY
8JENA
13JERK
9JERKILY
4JERSEY
9JERUSALEM
57JEST
16JESTING
35JESUIT
60JESUS
11JEUNE
49JEW
17JEWEL
5JEWISH
78JOB
6JOCOSE
6JOHN
47JOIN
46JOINED
7JOINT
102JOKE
4JOKER
57JOKING
17JOLLY
8JOLT
9JONES
18JOSE
8JOSEPH
8JOSEPHINE
4JOT
15JOUR
70JOURNAL
6JOURNALIST
78JOURNEY
15JOVE
390JOVEN
55JOVENES
8JOVIAL
4JOWL
136JOY
21JOYA
30JOYFUL
14JOYOUS
6JUAN
10JUDAS
133JUDGE
58JUDGMENT
41JUDICIAL
5JUDICIOUS
137JUEGO
141JUEZ
14JUG
65JUGAR
109JUICIO
6JULE
10JULIA
5JULIO
7JULIUS
17JULY
161JUMP
19JUNE
74JUNIOR
10JUNKER
17JUNTA
158JUNTO
72JUNTOS
8JUPITER
75JURADO
12JURISDICTION
90JURO
65JURY
779JUST
94JUSTICE
79JUSTICIA
16JUSTIFICATION
21JUSTIFIED
54JUSTIFY
5JUVENILE
72JUVENTUD
63JUZGAR

Несколько случайно найденных страниц

по слову JUNKER

1. Dostoevsky. Notes from the Underground (English. Записки из подполья). Part II. Chapter IV
Входимость: 1. Размер: 22кб.
Часть текста: in my own eyes and... and even before the waiters. I sat down; the servant began laying the table; I felt even more humiliated when he was present. Towards six o'clock they brought in candles, though there were lamps burning in the room. It had not occurred to the waiter, however, to bring them in at once when I arrived. In the next room two gloomy, angry- looking persons were eating their dinners in silence at two different tables. There was a great deal of noise, even shouting, in a room further away; one could hear the laughter of a crowd of people, and nasty little shrieks in French: there were ladies at the dinner. It was sickening, in fact. I rarely passed more unpleasant moments, so much so that when they did arrive all together punctually at six I was overjoyed to see them, as though they were my deliverers, and even forgot that it was incumbent upon me to show resentment. Zverkov walked in at the head of them; evidently he was the leading spirit. He and all of them were laughing; but, seeing me, Zverkov drew himself up a little, walked up to me deliberately with a slight, rather jaunty bend from the waist. He shook hands with me in a friendly, but not over- friendly, fashion, with a sort of circumspect courtesy like that of a General, as though in giving me his hand he were warding off something. I had imagined, on the contrary, that on coming in he would at once break into his habitual thin, shrill laugh and fall to making his insipid jokes and witticisms. I had been preparing for them ever since the previous day, but I had not expected such condescension, such high-official courtesy. So, then, he felt himself ineffably...
2. Dostoevsky. The Gambler (English. Игрок). Chapter VI
Входимость: 1. Размер: 20кб.
Часть текста: uproar there was! And what a welter of unseemliness and disorder and stupidity and bad manners! And I the cause of it all! Yet part of the scene was also ridiculous--at all events to myself it was so. I am not quite sure what was the matter with me--whether I was merely stupefied or whether I purposely broke loose and ran amok. At times my mind seems all confused; while at other times I seem almost to be back in my childhood, at the school desk, and to have done the deed simply out of mischief. It all came of Polina--yes, of Polina. But for her, there might never have been a fracas. Or perhaps I did the deed in a fit of despair (though it may be foolish of me to think so)? What there is so attractive about her I cannot think. Yet there IS something attractive about her--something passing fair, it would seem. Others besides myself she has driven to distraction. She is tall and straight, and very slim. Her body looks as though it could be tied into a knot, or bent double, like a cord. The imprint of her foot is long and narrow. It is, a maddening imprint--yes, simply a maddening one! And her hair has a reddish tint about it, and her eyes are...
3. Dostoevsky. El jugador (Spanish. Игрок). Capítulo 6
Входимость: 1. Размер: 20кб.
Часть текста: necedad, qué ordinariez ha habido en esto, de todo lo cual he sido yo la causa! A veces, sin embargo, me parece cosa de risa, a mí por lo menos. No consigo explicarme lo que me sucedió: estaba, en efecto, fuera de mí o simplemente me salí un momento del carril y me porté como un patán merecedor de que lo aten? A veces me parece que estoy ido de la cabeza, pero otras creo que soy un chicuelo no muy lejos todavía del banco de la escuela, y que lo que hago son sólo burdas chiquilladas de escolar. Ha sido Polina, todo ello ha sido obra de Polina. Sin ella no hubiera habido esas travesuras. Quién sabe! Acaso lo hice por desesperación (por muy necio que parezca suponerlo). No comprendo, no comprendo en qué consiste su atractivo. En cuanto a hermosa, lo es, debe de serlo, porque vuelve locos a otros hombres. Alta y bien plantada, sólo que muy delgada. Tengo la impresión de que puede hacerse un nudo con ella o plegarla en dos. Su pie es largo y estrecho -una tortura, eso es, una tortura-. Su pelo tiene un ligero tinte rojizo. Los ojos, auténticamente felinos y con qué orgullo y altivez sabe mirar con ellos! Hace cuatro meses, a raíz de mi llegada, estaba ella hablando una noche en la sala con Des Grieux. La conversación era acalorada. Y ella le miraba de tal modo... que más tarde, cuando fui a acostarme, saqué la conclusión de que acababa de darle una bofetada. Estaba de pie ante él y mirándole... Desde esa noche la quiero. Pero vamos al caso. Por una vereda entré en la avenida, me planté en medio de ella y me puse a esperar al barón y la baronesa. Cuando estuvieron a cinco pasos de mí me quité el sombrero y me incliné. Recuerdo que la baronesa llevaba un vestido de seda de mucho vuelo, gris oscuro, con...
4. Dostoevsky. A Raw Youth (English. Подросток). Part III. Chapter XI
Входимость: 1. Размер: 45кб.
Часть текста: Подросток). Part III. Chapter XI CHAPTER XI 1 I ran to Lambert. Oh, how I should have liked to give a show of logic to my behaviour, and to find some trace of common sense in my actions that evening and all that night; but even now, when I can reflect on it all, I am utterly unable to present my conduct in any clear and logical connection. It was a case of feeling, or rather a perfect chaos of feelings, in the midst of which I was naturally bound to go astray. It is true there was one dominant feeling, which mastered me completely and overwhelmed all the others, but. . . need I confess to it? Especially as I am not certain. . . . I ran to Lambert, beside myself of course. I positively scared Alphonsine and him for the first minute. I have always noticed that even the most profligate, most degraded Frenchmen are in their domestic life extremely given to a sort of bourgeois routine, a sort of very prosaic daily ceremonial of life established once and for ever. Lambert quickly realised, however, that something had happened, and was delighted that I had come to him at last, and that I was IN HIS CLUTCHES. He had been thinking of nothing else day and night! Oh, how badly he needed me! And behold now, when he had lost all hope, I had suddenly appeared of my own accord, and in such...
5. Dostoevsky. The Idiot (English. Идиот). Part IV. Chapter V
Входимость: 2. Размер: 46кб.
Часть текста: Varia for news while pretending to impart information; or perhaps, again, they had been unable to resist the feminine gratification of teasing a friend--for, after all this time, they could scarcely have helped divining the aim of her frequent visits. On the other hand, the prince, although he had told Lebedeff,--as we know, that nothing had happened, and that he had nothing to impart,--the prince may have been in error. Something strange seemed to have happened, without anything definite having actually happened. Varia had guessed that with her true feminine instinct. How or why it came about that everyone at the Epanchins' became imbued with one conviction--that something very important had happened to Aglaya, and that her fate was in process of settlement--it would be very difficult to explain. But no sooner had this idea taken root, than all at once declared that they had seen and observed it long ago; that they had remarked it at the time of the "poor knight" joke, and even before, though they had...

© 2000- NIV