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 Кол-во Слово
143LABIOS
227LADIES
211LADO
355LADY
162LAGRIMAS
101LAID
630LAMBERT
158LANDLADY
81LANDLORD
106LANZO
141LARGE
108LARGO
2052LAS
847LAST
199LATE
292LATER
238LATTER
449LAUGH
282LAUGHING
146LAUGHTER
157LAW
127LAWYER
206LAY
127LEAD
109LEARNED
252LEAST
281LEAVE
99LEAVING
377LEBEDEFF
143LEBYADKIN
117LED
432LEFT
139LEG
235LEI
115LEJOS
131LEMBKE
99LENGTH
334LES
152LESS
100LESSON
658LET
713LETTER
175LEVANTO
96LIBERTAD
84LIBRE
113LIBRO
160LIE
113LIES
660LIFE
88LIFT
225LIGHT
1183LIKE
130LIKED
126LIKELY
119LINE
187LIP
236LIPUTIN
260LISA
472LISE
517LISTEN
119LITERARY
900LITTLE
271LIVE
160LIVED
86LIVES
182LIVING
464LIZA
185LIZABETHA
178LIZAVETA
139LLEGADO
131LLEGAR
145LLEGO
86LLENO
140LLEVABA
88LLEVAR
100LLORAR
92LOCKED
128LOCO
187LODGING
602LONG
122LONGER
1520LOOK
139LORD
140LORO
3113LOS
106LOSE
249LOST
143LOT
85LOUD
880LOVE
204LOVED
111LOW
331LUEGO
152LUGAR
364LUI
148LUJINE
96LUZ
113LUZHIN
82LYAMSHIN
186LYING

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по слову LIVID

1. Dostoevsky. The Idiot (English. Идиот). Part IV. Chapter VIII
Входимость: 1. Размер: 46кб.
Часть текста: the expectation that this day something important, something decisive, was to happen to him. His attack of yesterday had been a slight one. Excepting some little heaviness in the head and pain in the limbs, he did not feel any particular effects. His brain worked all right, though his soul was heavy within him. He rose late, and immediately upon waking remembered all about the previous evening; he also remembered, though not quite so clearly, how, half an hour after his fit, he had been carried home. He soon heard that a messenger from the Epanchins' had already been to inquire after him. At half-past eleven another arrived; and this pleased him. Vera Lebedeff was one of the first to come to see him and offer her services. No sooner did she catch sight of him than she burst into tears; but when he tried to soothe her she began to laugh. He was quite struck by the girl's deep sympathy for him; he seized her hand and kissed it. Vera flushed crimson. "Oh, don't, don't!" she exclaimed in alarm, snatching her hand away. She went hastily out of the room in a state of strange confusion. Lebedeff also came to see the prince, in a great hurry to get away to the "deceased," as he called General Ivolgin, who was alive still, but very ill. Colia also turned up, and begged the prince for pity's sake to tell him all he knew about his father which had been concealed from him till now. He said he had found out nearly everything since yesterday; the poor boy was in a state of deep affliction. With all the sympathy which he could bring into play, the prince told Colia the whole story without reserve, detailing the facts as clearly as he could. The tale struck Colia like a thunderbolt. He could not speak. He listened silently, and cried softly to himself the while. The prince perceived that this was an impression which would last for the whole of the boy's life. He made haste to explain his view of the matter, and...
2. Dostoevsky. The Idiot (English. Идиот). Part IV. Chapter IV
Входимость: 1. Размер: 30кб.
Часть текста: were some piece of china which he was afraid of breaking. On scrutinizing him, the prince soon saw that the general was quite a different man from what he had been the day before; he looked like one who had come to some momentous resolve. His calmness, however, was more apparent than real. He was courteous, but there was a suggestion of injured innocence in his manner. "I've brought your book back," he began, indicating a book lying on the table. "Much obliged to you for lending it to me." "Ah, yes. Well, did you read it, general? It's curious, isn't it?" said the prince, delighted to be able to open up conversation upon an outside subject. "Curious enough, yes, but crude, and of course dreadful nonsense; probably the man lies in every other sentence." The general spoke with considerable confidence, and dragged his words out with a conceited drawl. "Oh, but it's only the simple tale of an old soldier who saw the French enter Moscow. Some of his remarks were wonderfully interesting. Remarks of an eye-witness are always valuable, whoever he be, don't you think so "Had I been the publisher I should not have printed it. As to the evidence of eye-witnesses, in these days people prefer impudent lies to the stories of men of worth and long service. I know of some notes of the year 1812, which--I have determined, prince, to leave this house, Mr. Lebedeff's house." The general looked significantly at his host. "Of course you have your own lodging at Pavlofsk at--at your daughter's house," began the prince, quite at a loss what to say. He suddenly recollected that the general had come for advice on a most important matter, affecting his destiny. "At my wife's; in other words, at my own place, my daughter's house." "I beg your pardon, I--"...
3. Dostoevsky. The Idiot (English. Идиот). Part I. Chapter IX
Входимость: 1. Размер: 20кб.
Часть текста: day, pointed out plainly enough which way she intended to make her decision! The incredulous amazement with which all regarded the prince did not last long, for Nastasia herself appeared at the door and passed in, pushing by the prince again. "At last I've stormed the citadel! Why do you tie up your bell?" she said, merrily, as she pressed Gania's hand, the latter having rushed up to her as soon as she made her appearance. "What are you looking so upset about? Introduce me, please!" The bewildered Gania introduced her first to Varia, and both women, before shaking hands, exchanged looks of strange import. Nastasia, however, smiled amiably; but Varia did not try to look amiable, and kept her gloomy expression. She did not even vouchsafe the usual courteous smile of etiquette. Gania darted a terrible glance of wrath at her for this, but Nina Alexandrovna, mended matters a little when Gania introduced her at last. Hardly, however, had the old lady begun about her " highly gratified feelings," and so on, when Nastasia left her, and flounced into a chair by Gania's side in the corner by the window, and cried: "Where's your study? and where are the--the lodgers? You do take in lodgers, don't you?" Gania looked dreadfully put out, and tried to say something in reply, but Nastasia interrupted him: "Why, where are you going to squeeze lodgers in here? Don't you use a study? Does this sort of thing pay?" she added, turning to Nina Alexandrovna. "Well, it is troublesome, rather," said the latter; "but...
4. Dostoevsky. The Idiot (English. Идиот). Part III. Chapter III
Входимость: 1. Размер: 39кб.
Часть текста: In her opinion there was so much disclosed and laid bare by the episode, that, in spite of the chaotic condition of her mind, she was able to feel more or less decided on certain points which, up to now, had been in a cloudy condition. However, one and all of the party realized that something important had happened, and that, perhaps fortunately enough, something which had hitherto been enveloped in the obscurity of guess-work had now begun to come forth a little from the mists. In spite of Prince S. 's assurances and explanations, Evgenie Pavlovitch's real character and position were at last coming to light. He was publicly convicted of intimacy with "that creature." So thought Lizabetha Prokofievna and her two elder daughters. But the real upshot of the business was that the number of riddles to be solved was augmented. The two girls, though rather irritated at their mother's exaggerated alarm and haste to depart from the scene, had been unwilling to worry her at first with questions. Besides, they could not help thinking that their sister Aglaya probably knew more about the whole matter than both they and their mother put together. Prince S. looked as black as night, and was silent and moody. Mrs. Epanchin did not say a word to him all the way home, and he did not seem to observe the...
5. Dostoevsky. The Insulted and Injured (English. Униженные и оскорбленные). Part III. Chapter VII
Входимость: 1. Размер: 7кб.
Часть текста: in the gateway a strange figure rushed out from under the street-lamp, so strange that I uttered a cry. It was a living thing, terror-stricken, shaking, half- crazed, and it caught at my hand with a scream. I was over- whelmed with horror. It was Nellie. "Nellie, what is it?" I cried. "What's the matter?" "There, upstairs. . . he's in our. . . rooms." "Who is it? Come along, come with me." "I won't, I won't. I'll wait till he's gone away. . . in the passage. . . I won't." I went up to my room with a strange foreboding in my heart, opened the door and saw Prince Valkovsky. He was sitting at the table reading my novel. At least, the book was open. "Ivan Petrovitch," he cried, delighted. "I'm so glad you've come back at last. I was on the very point of going away. I've been waiting over an hour for you. I promised the countess at her earnest and particular wish to take you to see her this evening. She begged me so specially,...

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