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172MAD
142MADAM
269MADAME
661MADE
353MADEMOISELLE
435MADRE
274MAI
345MAKAR
158MAKAROVITCH
613MAKE
201MAKING
194MAL
344MAMA
147MAMMA
1469MAN
319MANANA
256MANERA
131MANNER
604MANO
346MANY
249MARFA
252MARIE
200MARRIAGE
197MARRIED
247MARRY
164MARYA
2225MAS
151MASTER
418MATTER
149MAVRIKY
677MAY
355MEAN
179MEANS
186MEANT
141MEDIA
181MEDIO
154MEET
165MEETING
217MEJOR
383MEN
175MENOR
368MENOS
144MES
304MESA
203MET
256MIA
200MIEDO
228MIENTRAS
568MIGHT
205MIHAILOVNA
477MIL
506MIND
165MINE
448MINUTE
591MIO
144MIRABA
276MIRADA
177MIRO
502MIS
131MISERABLE
249MISMA
674MISMO
207MISTER
776MITIA
931MITYA
141MIUSOV
170MLLE
402MODO
200MOLTO
671MOMENT
643MOMENTO
140MOMENTOS
193MON
139MONASTERIO
150MONASTERY
717MONEY
236MONK
174MONSIEUR
187MONTH
173MONTHS
1252MORE
399MORNING
286MORROW
234MOSCOW
169MOSCU
597MOST
1004MOTHER
146MOVED
679MUCH
459MUCHO
161MUERTE
132MUISHKIN
380MUJER
167MUJERES
426MUNDO
367MURDER
890MUST
218MUTTER
852MUY
852MYSELF

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по слову MERIT

1. Dostoevsky. The Double (English. Двойник). Chapter VIII
Входимость: 1. Размер: 32кб.
Часть текста: adventures of the previous evening - and frowned as he recalled them. "Ugh, I did play the fool last night!" he thought, sitting up and glancing at his visitor's bed. But what was his amazement when he saw in the room no trace, not only of his visitor, but even of the bed on which his visitor had slept! "What does it mean?" Mr. Golyadkin almost shrieked. "What can it be? What does this new circumstance portend?" While Mr. Golyadkin was gazing in open-mouthed bewilderment at the empty spot, the door creaked and Petrushka came in with the tea-tray. "Where, where?" our hero said in a voice hardly audible, pointing to the place which had ben occupied by his visitor the night before. At first Petrushka made no answer and did not look at his master, but fixed his eyes upon the corner to the right till Mr. Golyadkin felt compelled to look into that corner too. After a brief silence, however, Petrushka in a rude and husky voice answered that his master was not at home. "You idiot; why I'm your master, Petrushka!" said Mr. Golyadkin in a breaking voice, looking open-eyed a his servant. Petrushka made no reply, but he...
2. Dostoevsky. The Brothers Karamazov (English. Братья Карамазовы). Part III. Book VII. Alyosha. Chapter 2.A Critical Moment
Входимость: 1. Размер: 15кб.
Часть текста: But still the trouble was there and was so agonising that even long afterwards Alyosha thought of that sorrowful day as one of the bitterest and most fatal days of his life. If the question is asked: "Could all his grief and disturbance have been only due to the fact that his elder's body had shown signs of premature decomposition instead of at once performing miracles?" I must answer without beating about the bush, "Yes, it certainly was." I would only beg the reader not to be in too great a hurry to laugh at my young hero's pure heart. I am far from intending to apologise for him or to justify his innocent faith on the ground of his youth, or the little progress he had made in his studies, or any such reason. I must declare, on the contrary, that I have genuine respect for the qualities of his heart. No doubt a youth who received impressions cautiously, whose love was lukewarm, and whose mind was too prudent for his age and so of little value, such a young man might, I admit, have avoided what happened to my hero. But in some cases it is really more creditable to be carried away by an emotion, however unreasonable, which springs from a great love, than to be unmoved. And this is even truer in youth, for a young man who is always sensible is to be suspected and is of little worth -- that's my opinion! "But," reasonable people will exclaim perhaps, "every young man cannot believe in such a superstition and your hero is no model for others." To this I reply again, "Yes! my hero had faith, a faith holy and steadfast, but still I am not going to apologise for him." Though I declared above, and perhaps too hastily, that I should not explain or justify my hero, I see that some explanation is necessary for the understanding of the rest of my story. Let me say then, it was not a question of miracles. There ...
3. Dostoevsky. Crime and Punishment (English. Преступление и наказание). Part five. Chapter Five
Входимость: 1. Размер: 32кб.
Часть текста: Five LEBEZIATNIKOV looked perturbed. "I've come to you, Sofya Semyonovna," he began. "Excuse me... I thought I should find you," he said, addressing Raskolnikov suddenly, "that is, I didn't mean anything... of that sort... But I just thought... Katerina Ivanovna has gone out of her mind," he blurted out suddenly, turning from Raskolnikov to Sonia. Sonia screamed. "At least it seems so. But... we don't know what to do, you see! She came back- she seems to have been turned out somewhere, perhaps beaten.... So it seems at least,... She had run to your father's former chief, she didn't find him at home: he was dining at some other general's.... Only fancy, she rushed off there, to the other general's, and, imagine, she was so persistent that she managed to get the chief to see her, had him fetched out from dinner, it seems. You can imagine what happened. She was turned out, of course; but, according to her own story, she abused him and threw something at him. One may well believe it.... How it is she wasn't taken up, I can't understand! Now she is telling every one, including Amalia Ivanovna; but it's difficult to understand her, she is screaming and...
4. Dostoevsky. Crime and Punishment (English. Преступление и наказание). Part one. Chapter Four
Входимость: 1. Размер: 29кб.
Часть текста: even whilst he was reading the letter. The essential question was settled, and irrevocably settled, in his mind: "Never such a marriage while I am alive and Mr. Luzhin be damned;" "The thing is perfectly clear," he muttered to himself, with a malignant smile anticipating the triumph of his decision. "No, mother, no, Dounia, you won't deceive me! and then they apologise for not asking my advice and for taking the decision without me! I dare say! They imagine it is arranged now and can't be broken off; but we will see whether it can or not! A magnificent excuse: 'Pyotr Petrovitch is such a busy man that even his wedding has to be in post-haste, almost by express. ' No, Dounia, I see it all and I know what you want to say to me; and I know too what you were thinking about, when you walked up and down all night, and what your prayers were like before the Holy Mother of Kazan who stands in mother's bedroom. Bitter is the ascent to Golgotha.... Hm... so it is finally settled; you have determined to marry a sensible business man, Avdotya Romanovna, one who has a ...
5. Dostoevsky. The Insulted and Injured (English. Униженные и оскорбленные). Part III. Chapter X
Входимость: 1. Размер: 48кб.
Часть текста: answered, hesitating, "I never eat supper." "Well, of course, we'll have a talk, too, over supper," he added, looking intently and slyly into my face. There was no misunderstanding! "He means to speak out," I thought; "and that's just what I want." I agreed. "That's settled, then. To B. 's, in Great Morskaya." "A restaurant?" I asked with some hesitation. "Yes, why not? I don't often have supper at home. Surely you won't refuse to be my guest?" "But I've told you already that I never take supper." "But once in a way doesn't matter; especially as I'm inviting you. . ." Which meant he would pay for me. I am certain that he added that intentionally. I allowed myself to be taken, but made up my mind to pay for myself in the restaurant. We arrived. The prince engaged a private room, and with the taste of a connois- seur selected two or three dishes. They were expensive and so was the bottle of delicate wine which he ordered. All this was...

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