Cлова на букву "P"


А Б В Г Д Е Ж З И Й К Л М Н О П Р С Т У Ф Х Ц Ч Ш Щ Э Ю Я
0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Поиск  

Показаны лучшие 100 слов (из 1349).
Чтобы посмотреть все варианты, нажмите

 Кол-во Слово
664PADRE
360PALABRA
335PALABRAS
176PALE
230PAN
254PAPER
157PAR
1804PARA
232PARECE
229PARECIA
225PARIS
367PART
464PARTE
175PARTICULARLY
160PAS
172PASADO
319PASO
278PASS
183PAST
569PAVLOVITCH
612PAVLOVNA
219PAY
259PEASANT
745PEOPLE
1423PER
287PERCHE
152PERDIDO
140PERFECTLY
662PERHAPS
2960PERO
252PERSON
321PERSONA
240PESAR
327PETERSBURG
152PETERSBURGO
806PETROVITCH
607PETROVNA
256PHILIPOVNA
256PIE
289PIOTR
363PLACE
160PLAN
154PLAY
192PLEASE
139PLEASED
140POBRE
227POCKET
497POCO
147PODER
364PODIA
248PODIDO
154PODRIA
226POI
321POINT
139POLE
211POLICE
461POLINA
360POOR
3896POR
207PORFIRIO
215PORFIRY
568PORQUE
256POSIBLE
242POSITION
162POSITIVELY
217POSSIBLE
169PRAY
143PRECISAMENTE
186PREGUNTA
140PREGUNTAS
332PREGUNTO
247PRESENT
151PRESS
191PRIMA
147PRIMER
215PRIMERA
149PRIMERO
2213PRINCE
537PRINCIPE
193PRISONER
198PROBABLY
179PROKOFIEVNA
504PRONTO
151PROPOSITO
251PROPRIO
195PROSECUTOR
142PROUD
166PUBLIC
145PUDO
443PUEDE
261PUEDO
437PUERTA
644PUES
221PUESTO
188PULL
315PUNTO
149PURPOSE
145PUSO
518PUT
865PYOTR

Несколько случайно найденных страниц

по слову PARCEL

1. Dostoevsky. The Idiot (English. Идиот). Part I. Chapter VII
Входимость: 1. Размер: 32кб.
Часть текста: I a woman, and I've not been to Switzerland, and that is all the difference between us." "Don't be in a hurry, mother; the prince says that he has some motive behind his simplicity," cried Aglaya. "Yes, yes, so he does," laughed the others. "Oh, don't you begin bantering him," said mamma. "He is probably a good deal cleverer than all three of you girls put together. We shall see. Only you haven't told us anything about Aglaya yet, prince; and Aglaya and I are both waiting to hear." "I cannot say anything at present. I'll tell you afterwards." "Why? Her face is clear enough, isn't it?" "Oh yes, of course. You are very beautiful, Aglaya Ivanovna, so beautiful that one is afraid to look at you." "Is that all? What about her character?" persisted Mrs. Epanchin. "It is difficult to judge when such beauty is concerned. I have not prepared my judgment. Beauty is a riddle." "That means that you have set Aglaya a riddle!" said Adelaida. "Guess it, Aglaya! But she's pretty, prince, isn't she?" "Most wonderfully so," said the latter, warmly, gazing at Aglaya with admiration. "Almost as lovely as Nastasia Philipovna, but quite a different type." All present exchanged looks of surprise. "As lovely as WHO?" said Mrs. Epanchin. "As NASTASIA PHILIPOVNA? Where have you seen Nastasia Philipovna? What Nastasia Philipovna?" "Gavrila Ardalionovitch showed the general her portrait just now." "How so? Did he bring the portrait for my...
2. Dostoevsky. The Idiot (English. Идиот). Part I. Chapter XV
Входимость: 1. Размер: 23кб.
Часть текста: your presence? I am very sorry, and ask your forgiveness, but it cannot be helped--and I should be very grateful if you could all stay and witness this climax. However, just as you please, of course." The guests exchanged glances; they were annoyed and bewildered by the episode; but it was clear enough that all this had been pre- arranged and expected by Nastasia Philipovna, and that there was no use in trying to stop her now--for she was little short of insane. Besides, they were naturally inquisitive to see what was to happen. There was nobody who would be likely to feel much alarm. There were but two ladies present; one of whom was the lively actress, who was not easily frightened, and the other the silent German beauty who, it turned out, did not understand a word of Russian, and seemed to be as stupid as she was lovely. Her acquaintances invited her to their "At Homes" because she was so decorative. She was exhibited to their guests like a valuable picture, or vase, or statue, or firescreen. As for the men, Ptitsin was one of Rogojin's friends; Ferdishenko was as much at home as a fish in the sea, Gania, not yet recovered from his amazement, appeared to be chained to a pillory. The old professor did not in the least understand what was happening; but when he noticed how extremely agitated the mistress of the house, and her friends, seemed, he nearly wept, and trembled with fright: but he would rather have died than leave Nastasia Philipovna at such a crisis, for he loved her as if she were his own granddaughter. Afanasy Ivanovitch greatly disliked having anything to do with the affair, but he was too much interested to leave, in spite of the mad turn things had taken; and a few words that had dropped from...
3. Dostoevsky. The Double (English. Двойник). Chapter X
Входимость: 1. Размер: 50кб.
Часть текста: of Andrey Filippovitch appeared before him in a strange, mysterious half-light. It was a frigid, wrathful figure, with a cold, harsh eye and with stiffly polite word of blame on its lips. . . and as soon as Mr. Golyadkin began going up to Andrey Filippovitch to defend himself in some way and to prove to him that he was not at all such as his enemies represented him, that he was like this and like that, that he even possessed innate virtues of his own, superior to the average - at once a person only too well known for his discreditable behaviour appeared on the scene, and by some most revolting means instantly frustrated poor Mr. Golyadkin's efforts, on the spot, almost before the latter's eyes, blackened his reputation, trampled his dignity in the mud, and then immediately took possession of his place in the service and in society. At another time Mr. Golyadkin's head felt sore from some sort of slight blow of late conferred and humbly accepted, received either in the course of daily life or somehow in the performance of his duty, against which blow it was difficult to protest. . . And while Mr. Golyadkin was racking his brains over the question of why it was difficult to protest even against such a blow, this idea of a blow gradually melted away into a different form - into the form of some familiar, trifling, or rather important piece of nastiness which he had seen, heard, or even himself committed - and frequently committed, indeed, and not on nasty ground, not from any nasty impulse, even, but just because it happened - sometimes, for instance, out of delicacy, another time owing to his absolute defencelessness - in fact, because. . . because, in fact, Mr. Golyadkin knew perfectly well because of what! At this point Mr. Golyadkin blushed in his sleep, and,...
4. Dostoevsky. A Raw Youth (English. Подросток). Part I. Chapter VI
Входимость: 2. Размер: 60кб.
Часть текста: mood and replace it by a bad one. My bad impressions, I regret to say, are not so quickly dispelled, though I am not resentful. . . . When I went in, I had a feeling that my mother immediately and hastily broke off what she was saying to Tatyana Pavlovna; I fancied they were talking very eagerly. My sister turned from her work only for a moment to look at me and did not come out of her little alcove again. The flat consisted of three rooms. The room in which we usually sat, the middle room or drawing-room, was fairly large and almost presentable. In it were soft, red armchairs and a sofa, very much the worse for wear, however (Versilov could not endure covers on furniture); there were rugs of a sort and several tables, including some useless little ones. On the right was Versilov's room, cramped and narrow with one window; it was furnished with a wretched-looking writing-table covered with unused books and crumpled papers, and an equally wretched-looking easy chair with a broken spring that stuck up in one corner and often made Versilov groan and swear. On an equally threadbare sofa in this room he used to sleep. He hated this study of his, and I believe he never did anything in it; he preferred sitting idle for hours together in the drawing-room. On the left of the drawing-room there was another room of the same sort in which my mother and sister slept. The drawing-room was entered from the passage at the end of which was the kitchen, where the cook, Lukerya, lived, and when she cooked, she ruthlessly filled the whole flat with the smell of burnt fat. There were moments when Versilov cursed his life and fate aloud on account of...
5. Dostoevsky. Crime and Punishment (English. Преступление и наказание). Part two. Chapter Three
Входимость: 2. Размер: 32кб.
Часть текста: he was in a feverish state, sometimes delirious, sometimes half conscious. He remembered a great deal afterwards. Sometimes it seemed as though there were a number of people round him; they wanted to take him away somewhere, there was a great deal of squabbling and discussing about him. Then he would be alone in the room; they had all gone away afraid of him, and only now and then opened the door a crack to look at him; they threatened him, plotted something together, laughed, and mocked at him. He remembered Nastasya often at his bedside; he distinguished another person, too, whom he seemed to know very well, though he could not remember who he was, and this fretted him, even made him cry. Sometimes he fancied he had been lying there a month; at other times it all seemed part of the same day. But of that- of that he had no recollection, and yet every minute he felt that he had forgotten something he ought to remember. He worried and tormented himself trying to remember, moaned, flew into a rage, or sank into awful, intolerable terror. Then he struggled to get up, would have run away, but some one always prevented him by force, and he sank back into impotence and forgetfulness. At last he returned to complete consciousness. It happened at ten o'clock in the morning. On fine days the sun shone into the room ...

© 2000- NIV