Cлова на букву "P"


А Б В Г Д Е Ж З И Й К Л М Н О П Р С Т У Ф Х Ц Ч Ш Щ Э Ю Я
0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Поиск  

Показаны лучшие 100 слов (из 1349).
Чтобы посмотреть все варианты, нажмите

 Кол-во Слово
664PADRE
360PALABRA
335PALABRAS
176PALE
230PAN
254PAPER
157PAR
1804PARA
232PARECE
229PARECIA
225PARIS
367PART
464PARTE
175PARTICULARLY
160PAS
172PASADO
319PASO
278PASS
183PAST
569PAVLOVITCH
612PAVLOVNA
219PAY
259PEASANT
745PEOPLE
1423PER
287PERCHE
152PERDIDO
140PERFECTLY
662PERHAPS
2960PERO
252PERSON
321PERSONA
240PESAR
327PETERSBURG
152PETERSBURGO
806PETROVITCH
607PETROVNA
256PHILIPOVNA
256PIE
289PIOTR
363PLACE
160PLAN
154PLAY
192PLEASE
139PLEASED
140POBRE
227POCKET
497POCO
147PODER
364PODIA
248PODIDO
154PODRIA
226POI
321POINT
139POLE
211POLICE
461POLINA
360POOR
3896POR
207PORFIRIO
215PORFIRY
568PORQUE
256POSIBLE
242POSITION
162POSITIVELY
217POSSIBLE
169PRAY
143PRECISAMENTE
186PREGUNTA
140PREGUNTAS
332PREGUNTO
247PRESENT
151PRESS
191PRIMA
147PRIMER
215PRIMERA
149PRIMERO
2213PRINCE
537PRINCIPE
193PRISONER
198PROBABLY
179PROKOFIEVNA
504PRONTO
151PROPOSITO
251PROPRIO
195PROSECUTOR
142PROUD
166PUBLIC
145PUDO
443PUEDE
261PUEDO
437PUERTA
644PUES
221PUESTO
188PULL
315PUNTO
149PURPOSE
145PUSO
518PUT
865PYOTR

Несколько случайно найденных страниц

по слову PLAYED

1. Dostoevsky. The Gambler (English. Игрок). Chapter III
Входимость: 1. Размер: 12кб.
Часть текста: between us relations which, to a large extent, were incomprehensible to me, considering her general pride and aloofness. For example, although she knew that I was madly in love with her, she allowed me to speak to her of my passion (though she could not well have showed her contempt for me more than by permitting me, unhindered and unrebuked, to mention to her my love). "You see," her attitude expressed, "how little I regard your feelings, as well as how little I care for what you say to me, or for what you feel for me." Likewise, though she spoke as before concerning her affairs, it was never with complete frankness. In her contempt for me there were refinements. Although she knew well that I was aware of a certain circumstance in her life of something which might one day cause her trouble, she would speak to me about her affairs (whenever she had need of me for a given end) as though I were a slave or a passing acquaintance--yet tell them me only in so far as one would need to know them if one were going to be made temporary use of. Had I not known the whole chain of events, or had she not seen how much I was pained and disturbed by her teasing insistency, she would never have thought it worthwhile to soothe me with this frankness--even though, since she not infrequently used me to execute commissions that were not only troublesome, but risky, she ought, in my opinion, to have been frank in ANY case. But, forsooth, it was not worth her while to trouble about MY feelings--about the fact that I was uneasy, and, perhaps, thrice as put about by her cares and misfortunes as she was herself! For three weeks I had known of her intention to take to roulette. She had even warned me that she would like me to play on her behalf, since it was unbecoming for her to play in person; and, from the tone of her words I had...
2. Dostoevsky. The Idiot (English. Идиот). Part III. Chapter VIII
Входимость: 1. Размер: 34кб.
Часть текста: bench; then sat down beside her and reflected. Aglaya did not begin the conversation, but contented herself with watching her companion intently. He looked back at her, but at times it was clear that he did not see her and was not thinking of her. Aglaya began to flush up. "Oh yes!" cried the prince, starting. "Hippolyte's suicide--" "What? At your house?" she asked, but without much surprise. "He was alive yesterday evening, wasn't he? How could you sleep here after that?" she cried, growing suddenly animated. "Oh, but he didn't kill himself; the pistol didn't go off." Aglaya insisted on hearing the whole story. She hurried the prince along, but interrupted him with all sorts of questions, nearly all of which were irrelevant. Among other things, she seemed greatly interested in every word that Evgenie Pavlovitch had said, and made the prince repeat that part of the story over and over again. "Well, that'll do; we must be quick," she concluded, after hearing all. "We have only an hour here, till eight; I must be home by then without fail, so that they may not find out that I came and sat here with you; but I've come on business. I...
3. Dostoevsky. The Brothers Karamazov (English. Братья Карамазовы). Part III. Book VIII. Mitya. Chapter 7.The First and Rightful Lover
Входимость: 1. Размер: 43кб.
Часть текста: Chapter 7 The First and Rightful Lover WITH his long, rapid strides, Mitya walked straight up to the table. "Gentlemen," he said in a loud voice, almost shouting, yet stammering at every word, "I... I'm all right! Don't be afraid!" he exclaimed, "I -- there's nothing the matter," he turned suddenly to Grushenka, who had shrunk back in her chair towards Kalganov, and clasped his hand tightly. "I... I'm coming, too. I'm here till morning. Gentlemen, may I stay with you till morning? Only till morning, for the last time, in this same room?" So he finished, turning to the fat little man, with the pipe, sitting on the sofa. The latter removed his pipe from his lips with dignity and observed severely: "Panie,* we're here in private. There are other rooms." * Pan and Panie mean Mr. in Polish. Pani means Mrs., Panovie, gentlemen. "Why, it's you, Dmitri Fyodorovitch! What do you mean?" answered Kalgonov suddenly. "Sit down with us. How are you?" "Delighted to see you, dear... and precious fellow, I always thought a lot of you." Mitya responded, joyfully and eagerly, at once holding out his hand across the table. "Aie! How tight you squeeze! You've quite broken my fingers," laughed Kalganov. "He always squeezes like that, always," Grushenka put in gaily, with a timid smile, seeming suddenly convinced from Mitya's face that he was not...
4. Dostoevsky. The Brothers Karamazov (English. Братья Карамазовы). Part IV. Book X. The Boys. Chapter 4.The Lost Dog
Входимость: 1. Размер: 19кб.
Часть текста: than I am, yet he is half a head taller. But I have a clever face. I am not good-looking. I know I'm hideous, but I've a clever face. I mustn't talk too freely; if I fall into his arms all at once, he may think- Tfoo! how horrible if he should think -- !" Such were the thoughts that excited Kolya while he was doing his utmost to assume the most independent air. What distressed him most was his being so short; he did not mind so much his "hideous" face, as being so short. On the wall in a corner at home he had the year before made a pencil-mark to show his height, and every two months since he anxiously measured himself against it to see how much he had gained. But alas! he grew very slowly, and this sometimes reduced him almost to despair. His face was in reality by no means "hideous"; on the contrary, it was rather attractive, with a fair, pale skin, freckled. His small, lively grey eyes had a fearless look, and often glowed with feeling. He had rather high cheekbones; small, very red, but not very thick, lips; his nose was small and unmistakably turned up. "I've a regular pug nose, a regular pug nose," Kolya used to mutter to himself when he looked in the looking-glass, and he always left it with indignation. "But perhaps I haven't got a clever face?" he sometimes thought, doubtful even of that. But it must not be supposed that his mind was preoccupied with his face and his height. On the contrary, however bitter the moments before the looking-glass were to him, he quickly forgot them, and forgot them for a long time, "abandoning himself entirely to ideas and to real life," as he formulated it to himself....
5. Dostoevsky. The Brothers Karamazov (English. Братья Карамазовы). Part IV. Book X. The Boys. Chapter 5. By Ilusha"s Bedside
Входимость: 1. Размер: 40кб.
Часть текста: sympathy shown him by these boys, who had been his enemies. Krassotkin was the only one missing and his absence was a heavy load on Ilusha's heart. Perhaps the bitterest of all his bitter memories was his stabbing Krassotkin, who had been his one friend and protector. Clever little Smurov, who was the first to make it up with Ilusha, thought it was so. But when Smurov hinted to Krassotkin that Alyosha wanted to come and see him about something, the latter cut him short, bidding Smurov tell "Karamazov" at once that he knew best what to do, that he wanted no one's advice, and that, if he went to see Ilusha, he would choose his own time for he had "his own reasons." That was a fortnight before this Sunday. That was why Alyosha had not been to see him, as he had meant to. But though he waited he sent Smurov to him twice again. Both times Krassotkin met him with a curt, impatient refusal, sending Alyosha a message not to bother him any more, that if he came himself, he, Krassotkin, would not go to Ilusha at all. Up to the very last day, Smurov did not know that Kolya meant to go to Ilusha that morning, and only the evening before, as he parted from Smurov, Kolya abruptly told him to wait at home for him next morning, for he would go with him to the Snegiryovs, but warned him on no account to say he was coming, as he wanted to drop in casually. Smurov obeyed. Smurov's fancy that Kolya would bring back the lost dog was based on the words Kolya had dropped that "they must be asses not to find the dog, if it was alive." When Smurov, waiting for an opportunity, timidly hinted at his guess about the dog, Krassotkin flew into a violent rage. "I'm not such an ass as to go hunting about the town for other people's dogs when I've got a dog of my own! And how can you imagine a dog could be alive after swallowing a pin? Sheepish sentimentality, thats what it is! For the last fortnight Ilusha had not left his little bed under the...

© 2000- NIV