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664PADRE
360PALABRA
335PALABRAS
176PALE
230PAN
254PAPER
157PAR
1804PARA
232PARECE
229PARECIA
225PARIS
367PART
464PARTE
175PARTICULARLY
160PAS
172PASADO
319PASO
278PASS
183PAST
569PAVLOVITCH
612PAVLOVNA
219PAY
259PEASANT
745PEOPLE
1423PER
287PERCHE
152PERDIDO
140PERFECTLY
662PERHAPS
2960PERO
252PERSON
321PERSONA
240PESAR
327PETERSBURG
152PETERSBURGO
806PETROVITCH
607PETROVNA
256PHILIPOVNA
256PIE
289PIOTR
363PLACE
160PLAN
154PLAY
192PLEASE
139PLEASED
140POBRE
227POCKET
497POCO
147PODER
364PODIA
248PODIDO
154PODRIA
226POI
321POINT
139POLE
211POLICE
461POLINA
360POOR
3896POR
207PORFIRIO
215PORFIRY
568PORQUE
256POSIBLE
242POSITION
162POSITIVELY
217POSSIBLE
169PRAY
143PRECISAMENTE
186PREGUNTA
140PREGUNTAS
332PREGUNTO
247PRESENT
151PRESS
191PRIMA
147PRIMER
215PRIMERA
149PRIMERO
2213PRINCE
537PRINCIPE
193PRISONER
198PROBABLY
179PROKOFIEVNA
504PRONTO
151PROPOSITO
251PROPRIO
195PROSECUTOR
142PROUD
166PUBLIC
145PUDO
443PUEDE
261PUEDO
437PUERTA
644PUES
221PUESTO
188PULL
315PUNTO
149PURPOSE
145PUSO
518PUT
865PYOTR

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по слову PREFER

1. Dostoevsky. A Raw Youth (English. Подросток). Part I. Chapter X
Входимость: 1. Размер: 45кб.
Часть текста: not believe my eyes: on the sofa on which I had slept the previous night was sitting my mother, and beside her--the unhappy mother of the dead girl. They were holding each other's hands, they were talking in whispers, I suppose, that they might not wake me, and both were crying. I got up from the bed, and flew straight to kiss my mother. She positively beamed all over, kissed me and make the sign of the cross over me three times with the right hand. Before we had time to say a word the door opened, and Versilov and Vassin came in. My mother at once got up and led the bereaved woman away. Vassin gave me his hand, while Versilov sank into an armchair without saying a word to me. Mother and he had evidently been here for some time. His face looked overcast and careworn. "What I regret most of all," he began saying slowly to Vassin, evidently in continuation of what they had been discussing outside, "is that I had no time to set it all right yesterday evening; then probably this terrible thing would not have happened! And indeed there was time, it was hardly eight o'clock. As soon as she ran away from us last night, I inwardly resolved to follow her and to reassure her, but this unforeseen and urgent business, though of course I might quite well have put it off...
2. Dostoevsky. The Idiot (English. Идиот). Part II. Chapter VIII
Входимость: 1. Размер: 42кб.
Часть текста: stammered Antip Burdovsky. He was extremely excited; his lips trembled, and the resentment of an embittered soul was in his voice. But he spoke so indistinctly that hardly a dozen words could be gathered. "It was a princely action!" sneered Hippolyte. "If anyone had treated me so," grumbled the boxer. "I mean to say that if I had been in Burdovsky's place... I..." "Gentlemen, I did not know you were there; I have only just been informed, I assure you," repeated Muishkin. "We are not afraid of your friends, prince," remarked Lebedeff's nephew, "for we are within our rights." The shrill tones of Hippolyte interrupted him. "What right have you... by what right do you demand us to submit this matter, about Burdovsky... to the judgment of your friends? We know only too well what the judgment of your friends will be! ..." This beginning gave promise of a stormy discussion. The prince was much discouraged, but at last he managed to make himself heard amid the vociferations of his excited visitors. "If you," he said, addressing Burdovsky--"if you prefer not to speak here, I offer again to go into another room with you... and as to your waiting to see me, I repeat that I only this instant heard..." "Well, you have no right, you have no right, no right at all!... Your friends indeed!"... gabbled Burdovsky, defiantly examining the faces round him, and becoming more and more excited. "You have no right!..." As he ended thus abruptly, he leant forward, staring at the prince with his short-sighted, bloodshot eyes. The latter was so astonished, that he did not reply, but looked steadily at him in return. "Lef Nicolaievitch!" interposed Madame ...
3. Dostoevsky. The Possessed (English. Бесы). Part II. Chapter I. Night
Входимость: 1. Размер: 116кб.
Часть текста: not exist. I need hardly say that there were rumours of the most varied kind going about the town in regard to the blow that Stavrogin had received, Lizaveta Nikolaevna's fainting fit, and all that happened on that Sunday. But what we wondered was, through whom the story had got about so quickly and so accurately. Not one of the persons present had any need to give away the secret of what had happened, or interest to serve by doing so. The servants had not been present. Lebyadkinwas the only one who might have chattered, not so much from spite, for he had gone out in great alarm (and fear of an enemy destroys spite against him), but simply from incontinence of speech-But Lebyadkin and his sister had disappeared next day, and nothing could be heard of them. There was no trace of them at Filipov's house, they had moved, no one knew where, and seemed to have vanished. Shatov, of whom I wanted to inquire about Marya Timofyevna, would not open his door, and I believe sat locked up in his room for the whole of those eight days, even discontinuing his work in the town. He would not see me. I went to see him on Tuesday and knocked at his door. I got no answer, but being convinced by unmistakable evidence that he was at home, I knocked a second time. Then, jumping up,...
4. Dostoevsky. The Brothers Karamazov (English. Братья Карамазовы). Part II. Book V. Pro and Contra. Chapter 4.Rebellion
Входимость: 2. Размер: 28кб.
Часть текста: Zossima has talked of that more than once," observed Alyosha; "he, too, said that the face of a man often hinders many people not practised in love, from loving him. But yet there's a great deal of love in mankind, and almost Christ-like love. I know that myself, Ivan." "Well, I know nothing of it so far, and can't understand it, and the innumerable mass of mankind are with me there. The question is, whether that's due to men's bad qualities or whether it's inherent in their nature. To my thinking, Christ-like love for men is a miracle impossible on earth. He was God. But we are not gods. Suppose I, for instance, suffer intensely. Another can never know how much I suffer, because he is another and not I. And what's more, a man is rarely ready to admit another's suffering (as though it were a distinction). Why won't he admit it, do you think? Because I smell unpleasant, because I have a stupid face, because I once trod on his foot. Besides, there is suffering and suffering; degrading, humiliating suffering such as humbles me -- hunger, for instance -- my benefactor will perhaps allow me; but when you come to higher suffering -- for an idea, for instance -- ...
5. Dostoevsky. A Raw Youth (English. Подросток). Part I. Chapter IX
Входимость: 1. Размер: 59кб.
Часть текста: that that I was pleased with. Apart from anything else, I was convinced that by taking this tone I had effaced all that was ridiculous in my position. But I had not time to think much about that: my mind was full of Kraft. Not that the thought of him distressed me very greatly, but yet I was shaken to my inmost depths, and so much so that the ordinary human feeling of pleasure at another man's misfortune--at his breaking his leg or covering himself with disgrace, at his losing some one dear to him, and so on--even this ordinary feeling of mean satisfaction was completely eclipsed by another absolutely single- hearted feeling, a feeling of sorrow, of compassion for Kraft--at least I don't know whether it was compassion, but it was a strong and warm-hearted feeling. And I was glad of this too. It's marvellous how many irrelevant ideas can flash through the mind at the very time when one is shattered by some tremendous piece of news, which one would have thought must overpower all other feelings and banish all extraneous thoughts, especially petty ones; yet petty ones, on the contrary, obtrude themselves. I remember, too, that I was gradually overcome by a quite perceptible nervous shudder, which lasted several minutes, in fact all the time I was at home and talking to Versilov. This interview followed...

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