Cлова на букву "Q"


А Б В Г Д Е Ж З И Й К Л М Н О П Р С Т У Ф Х Ц Ч Ш Щ Э Ю Я
0-9 A B C D E F G H I J K L M N O P Q R S T U V W X Y Z
Поиск  

Показаны лучшие 100 слов (из 108).
Чтобы посмотреть все варианты, нажмите

 Кол-во Слово
43QUA
4QUACK
1QUADRANGLE
17QUADRILLE
12QUADRILLION
1QUAKE
15QUAL
146QUALCHE
143QUALCOSA
55QUALCUNO
109QUALE
4QUALIFICATION
4QUALIFIED
15QUALITY
4QUALM
34QUAND
151QUANDO
2QUANTA
10QUANTITY
126QUANTO
83QUARREL
59QUARRELLED
1QUARRELLINGS
9QUARRELSOME
2QUART
105QUARTER
3QUARTERLY
21QUARTO
168QUASI
4QUAVER
2QUAVERING
2QUAY
13529QUE
70QUEDA
67QUEDABA
85QUEDADO
87QUEDE
144QUEDO
42QUEEN
65QUEER
1QUEERNESS
222QUEL
74QUELL
148QUELLA
168QUELLO
36QUELQUE
6QUELQUES
3QUENCH
1QUENCHED
274QUERIA
56QUERIDA
308QUERIDO
45QUEST
137QUESTA
52QUESTE
51QUESTI
543QUESTION
3QUESTIONABLE
41QUESTIONED
7QUESTIONER
44QUESTIONING
491QUESTO
312QUI
61QUICK
7QUICKEN
216QUICKLY
2QUICKNESS
6QUID
471QUIEN
67QUIERA
259QUIERE
126QUIERES
329QUIERO
125QUIET
5QUIETED
1QUIETEN
10QUIETER
100QUIETLY
2QUIETNESS
25QUILT
81QUINCE
71QUINIENTOS
2QUININE
2QUINSY
10QUINTA
32QUINTET
66QUISIERA
15QUIT
623QUITE
27QUITO
1QUITTANCE
52QUIVER
59QUIVERING
6QUIXOTE
245QUIZA
56QUIZAS
36QUO
17QUOT
5QUOTATION
20QUOTE

Несколько случайно найденных страниц

по слову QUICK

1. Dostoevsky. The Possessed (English. Бесы). Part III. Chapter I. The fete—first part
Входимость: 1. Размер: 70кб.
Часть текста: in spite of all the perplexities of the preceding “Shpigulin” day. I believe that even if Lembke had died the previous night, the fete would still have taken place next morning—so peculiar was the significance Yulia Mihailovna attached to it. Alas! up to the last moment she was blind and had no inkling of the state of public feeling. No one believed at last that the festive day would pass without some tremendous scandal, some “catastrophe” as some people expressed it, rubbing their hands in anticipation. Many people, it is true, tried to assume a frowning and diplomatic countenance; but, speaking generally, every Russian is inordinately delighted at any public scandal and disorder. It is true that we did feel something much more serious than the mere craving for a scandal: there was a general feeling of irritation, a feeling of implacable resentment; every one seemed thoroughly disgusted with everything. A kind of bewildered cynicism, a forced, as it were, strained cynicism was predominant in every one. The only people who were free from bewilderment were the ladies, and they were clear on only one point:' their remorseless detestation of Yulia Mihailovna. Ladies of all shades of opinion were agreed in this. And she, poor dear, had no suspicion; up to the last hour she was persuaded that she was “surrounded by followers,” and that they were still “fanatically devoted to her.” I have already hinted that some low fellows of different sorts had made their appearance amongst us. In turbulent times of upheaval ...
2. Dostoevsky. The Insulted and Injured (English. Униженные и оскорбленные). Part I. Chapter VI
Входимость: 1. Размер: 18кб.
Часть текста: with buttons missing from his uniform; and all this written in such simple language, exactly as we talk ourselves... Strange! Anna Andreyevna looked inquiringly at Nikolay Sergeyitch, and seemed positively pouting a little as though she were resentful. "Is it really worth while to print and read such nonsense, and they pay money for it, too," was written on her face. Natasha was all attention, she listened greedily, never taking her eyes off me, watching my lips as I pronounced each word, moving her own pretty lips after me. And yet before I had read half of it, tears were falling from the eyes of all three of them. Anna Andreyevna was genuinely crying, feeling for the troubles of my hero with all her heart, and longing with great naivety to help him in some way out of his troubles, as I gathered from her exclamations. The old man had already abandoned all hopes of anything elevated. "From the first step it's clear that you'll never be at the top of the tree; there it is, it's simply a little story; but it wrings your heart," he said, "and what's happening all round one grows easier to understand, and to remember, and one learns that the most down-trodden, humblest man is a man, too, and a brother." Natasha listened, cried, and squeezed my hand tight by stealth under the table. The reading was over. She got up, her cheeks were flushed, tears stood in her eyes. All at once she snatched my hand, kissed it, and ran out of the room. The father and mother looked at one another. "Hm ! what an enthusiastic creature she is," said the old man, struck by his daughter's behaviour. "That's nothing though, nothing, it's a good thing, a generous impulse! She's a good girl. . . ." he muttered, looking askance at his wife as though to justify Natasha and at the same time wanting ...
3. Dostoevsky. The Idiot (English. Идиот). Part I. Chapter II
Входимость: 1. Размер: 25кб.
Часть текста: Epanchin lived in his own house near the Litaynaya. Besides this large residence--five-sixths of which was let in flats and lodgings-the general was owner of another enormous house in the Sadovaya bringing in even more rent than the first. Besides these houses he had a delightful little estate just out of town, and some sort of factory in another part of the city. General Epanchin, as everyone knew, had a good deal to do with certain government monopolies; he was also a voice, and an important one, in many rich public companies of various descriptions; in fact, he enjoyed the reputation of being a well- to-do man of busy habits, many ties, and affluent means. He had made himself indispensable in several quarters, amongst others in his department of the government; and yet it was a known fact that Fedor Ivanovitch Epanchin was a man of no education whatever, and had absolutely risen from the ranks. This last fact could, of course, reflect nothing but credit upon the general; and yet, though unquestionably a sagacious man, he had his own little weaknesses-very excusable ones,--one of which was a dislike to any allusion to the above circumstance. He was undoubtedly clever. For instance, he made a point of never ...
4. Dostoevsky. Crime and Punishment (English. Преступление и наказание). Part four. Chapter Five
Входимость: 1. Размер: 42кб.
Часть текста: room which looked like an office, several clerks were sitting writing and obviously they had no notion who or what Raskolnikov might be. He looked uneasily and suspiciously about him to see whether there was not some guard, some mysterious watch being kept on him to prevent his escape. But there was nothing of the sort: he saw only the faces of clerks absorbed in petty details, then other people, no one seemed to have any concern with him. He might go where he liked for them. The conviction grew stronger in him that if that enigmatic man of yesterday, that phantom sprung out of the earth, had seen everything, they would not have let him stand and wait like that. And would they have waited till he elected to appear at eleven? Either the man had not yet given information, or... or simply he knew nothing, had seen nothing (and how could he have seen anything?) and so all that had happened to him the day before was again a phantom exaggerated by his sick and overstrained imagination. This conjecture had begun to grow strong the day before, in the midst of all his alarm and despair. Thinking it all over now and preparing for a fresh conflict, he was suddenly aware that he was trembling- and he felt a rush of indignation at the thought that he was trembling with fear at facing that hateful Porfiry Petrovitch. What he dreaded above all was meeting that man again; he hated him with an intense, unmitigated hatred and was afraid his hatred might betray him. His indignation was such that he ceased trembling at once;...
5. Dostoevsky. The Insulted and Injured (English. Униженные и оскорбленные). Part II. Chapter IX
Входимость: 1. Размер: 15кб.
Часть текста: Elena," I cried. "Who wants you to sweep the floor? I don't wish it, you're ill. Have you come here to be a drudge for me?" "Who is going to sweep the floor here?" she answered, drawing herself up and looking straight at me. "I'm not ill now." "But I didn't take you to make you work, Elena. You seem to be afraid I shall scold you like Mme. Bubnov for living with me for nothing. And where did you get that horrid broom? I had no broom," I added, looking at her in wonder. "It's my broom. I brought it here myself, I used to sweep the floor here for grandfather too. And the broom's been lying here ever since under the stove." I went back to the other room musing. Perhaps I may have been in error, but it seemed to me that she felt oppressed by my hospitality and that she wanted in every possible way to show me that she was doing something for her living. "What an embittered character, if so," I thought. Two minutes later she came in and without a word sat down on the sofa in the same place as yesterday, looking inquisitively at me. Meanwhile I boiled the kettle, made the tea, poured out a cup for her and handed it her with a slice of white bread. She took it in silence and without opposition. She had had nothing for twenty-four hours. "See, you've dirtied your pretty dress with that broom," I said, noticing a streak of dirt on her skirt. She looked down and suddenly, to my intense astonishment, she put down her cup, and, apparently calm and composed, she picked up a breadth of the muslin skirt in both hands and with one rip tore it from top to bottom. When she had done this she raised her stubborn, flashing eyes to me in silence. Her face was pale. "What are you about, Elena?" I cried, feeling sure the child was mad. "It's a horrid dress," she cried, almost gasping with excite- ment. "Why do you say it's a nice dress? I don't want to wear...

© 2000- NIV