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108RAG
91RAGE
132RAISED
198RAKITIN
136RAKITINE
325RAN
90RANK
97RAPIDAMENTE
78RASCAL
972RASKOLNIKOF
784RASKOLNIKOV
353RASUMIKHINE
365RATHER
204RAZON
348RAZUMIHIN
135REACHED
405READ
113READER
153READING
217READY
173REAL
98REALIDAD
88REALITY
81REALIZED
497REALLY
279REASON
78RECALL
99RECEIVE
173RECEIVED
88RECIBIDO
82RECKON
84RECOVER
153RECUERDO
157RED
88REFUSE
97REFUSED
113REGARD
97REGULAR
171REIR
93RELACIONES
150RELATION
87RELATO
248REMAIN
105REMARK
78REMARKABLE
92REMARKED
519REMEMBER
151REMEMBERED
147REPEAT
144REPEATED
188REPENTE
80REPITO
79REPLICO
171REPLIED
89REPLY
80REPROACH
148REPUSO
76RESOLVED
177RESPECT
77RESPECTABLE
131RESPONDIO
208REST
133RESTO
154RETURN
128RETURNED
143REVOLVER
95RICH
82RIDICULOUS
579RIGHT
114RINCON
89RING
126RISA
81RISE
113ROAD
216RODIA
196RODION
127RODYA
395ROGOJIN
78ROMAN
174ROMANOVITCH
217ROMANOVNA
887ROOM
119ROSE
267ROSTRO
125ROUBLE
427ROUBLES
122ROULETTE
310ROUND
498RUBLOS
107RUEGO
151RUIN
88RULE
257RUN
130RUNNING
218RUSH
111RUSIA
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80RUSSE
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1. Dostoevsky. The Brothers Karamazov (English. Братья Карамазовы). Part IV. Book X. The Boys. Chapter 5. By Ilusha"s Bedside
Входимость: 1. Размер: 40кб.
Часть текста: Ilusha, without "sheepish sentimentality," appearing to do so casually and without design. It was a great consolation to Ilusha in his suffering. He was greatly touched by seeing the almost tender affection and sympathy shown him by these boys, who had been his enemies. Krassotkin was the only one missing and his absence was a heavy load on Ilusha's heart. Perhaps the bitterest of all his bitter memories was his stabbing Krassotkin, who had been his one friend and protector. Clever little Smurov, who was the first to make it up with Ilusha, thought it was so. But when Smurov hinted to Krassotkin that Alyosha wanted to come and see him about something, the latter cut him short, bidding Smurov tell "Karamazov" at once that he knew best what to do, that he wanted no one's advice, and that, if he went to see Ilusha, he would choose his own time for he had "his own reasons." That was a fortnight before this Sunday. That was why Alyosha had not been to see him, as he had meant to. But though he waited he sent Smurov to him twice again. Both times Krassotkin met him with a curt, impatient refusal, sending Alyosha a message not to bother him any more, that if he came himself, he, Krassotkin, would not go to Ilusha at all. Up to the very last day, Smurov did not know that Kolya meant to go to Ilusha that morning, and only the evening before, as he parted from Smurov, Kolya abruptly told him to wait at home for him next morning, for he would go with him to the Snegiryovs, but warned him on no account to say he was coming, as he wanted to drop...
2. Dostoevsky. The Possessed (English. Бесы). Part II. Chapter X. Filibusters. A fatal morning
Входимость: 1. Размер: 58кб.
Часть текста: settlement of their grievances against the manager, who, in closing the factory and dismissing the workmen, had cheated them all in an impudent way—a fact which has since been proved conclusively. Some people still deny that there was any election of delegates, maintaining that seventy was too large a number to elect, and that the crowd simply consisted of those who had been most unfairly treated, and that they only came to ask for help in their own case, so that the general “mutiny” of the factory workers, about which there was such an uproar later on, had never existed at all. Others fiercely maintained that these seventy men were not simple strikers but revolutionists, that is, not merely that they were the most turbulent, but that they must have been worked upon by seditious manifestoes. The fact is, it is still uncertain whether there had been any outside influence or incitement at work or not. My private opinion is that the workmen had not read the seditious manifestoes at all, and if they had read them, would not have understood one word, for one reason because the authors of such literature write very obscurely in spite of the boldness of their style. But as the workmen really were in a difficult plight and the police to whom they appealed would not enter into their grievances, what could be more natural than their idea of going in a body to “the general himself” if possible, with the petition at their head, forming up in an orderly way before his door, and as soon...
3. Dostoevsky. The Insulted and Injured (English. Униженные и оскорбленные). Part IV. Chapter VI
Входимость: 1. Размер: 34кб.
Часть текста: hair. Seeing that I was remaining with her, Natasha asked me, too, to go and meet the visitor. "I could not get to Natasha's before," said Katya as she mounted the stairs. "I've been so spied on that it's awful. I've been persuading Mme. Albert for a whole fortnight, and at last she consented. And you have never once been to see me, Ivan Petrovitch! I couldn't write to you either, and I don't feel inclined to. One can't explain anything in a letter. And how I wanted to see you.... Good heavens, how my heart is beating." "The stairs are steep," I answered. "Yes. . . the stairs. . . . tell me, what do you think, won't Natasha be angry with me?" "No, why?" "Well. . . why should she after all? I shall see for myself directly. There's no need to ask questions." I gave her my arm. She actually turned pale, and I believe she was very much frightened. On the last landing she stopped to take breath; but she looked at me and went up resolutely. She stopped once more at the door and whispered to me. "I shall simply go in and say I had such faith in her that I was not afraid to come. . . . But why am I talking? I'm certain that Natasha is the noblest creature, Isn't she?" She went in timidly as though she were a culprit, and looked intently at Natasha, who at once smiled at her. Then Katya ran...
4. Dostoevsky. A Raw Youth (English. Подросток). Part I. Chapter IX
Входимость: 1. Размер: 59кб.
Часть текста: that: my mind was full of Kraft. Not that the thought of him distressed me very greatly, but yet I was shaken to my inmost depths, and so much so that the ordinary human feeling of pleasure at another man's misfortune--at his breaking his leg or covering himself with disgrace, at his losing some one dear to him, and so on--even this ordinary feeling of mean satisfaction was completely eclipsed by another absolutely single- hearted feeling, a feeling of sorrow, of compassion for Kraft--at least I don't know whether it was compassion, but it was a strong and warm-hearted feeling. And I was glad of this too. It's marvellous how many irrelevant ideas can flash through the mind at the very time when one is shattered by some tremendous piece of news, which one would have thought must overpower all other feelings and banish all extraneous thoughts, especially petty ones; yet petty ones, on the contrary, obtrude themselves. I remember, too, that I was gradually overcome by a quite perceptible nervous shudder, which lasted several minutes, in fact all the time I was at home and talking to Versilov. This interview followed under strange and exceptional circumstances. I had mentioned already that we lived in a separate lodge in the courtyard; this lodging was marked "No. 13." Before I had entered the gate I heard a woman's voice asking loudly, with impatience and irritation, "Where is No. 13?" The question was asked by a lady who was standing close to the gate and had opened the door of the little shop; but apparently she got no answer there, or was even repulsed, for she came down the ...
5. Dostoevsky. The Double (English. Двойник)
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Часть текста: and the clothes taken off in haste overnight and flung in a crumpled heap on the sofa, looked at him familiarly. At last the damp autumn day, muggy and dirty, peeped into the room through the dingy window pane with such a hostile, sour grimace that Mr. Golyadkin could not possibly doubt that he was not in the land of Nod, but in the city of Petersburg, in his own flat on the fourth storey of a huge block of buildings in Shestilavotchny Street. When he had made this important discovery Mr. Golyadkin nervously closed his eyes, as though regretting his dream and wanting to go back to it for a moment. But a minute later he leapt out of bed at one bound, probably all at once, grasping the idea about which his scattered and wandering thoughts had been revolving. From his bed he ran straight to a little round looking-glass that stood on his chest of drawers. Though the sleepy, short-sighted countenance and rather bald head reflected in the looking-glass were of such an insignificant type that at first sight they would...

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