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296SABE
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236SECOND
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670SEEM
302SEEN
253SEGUIDA
232SEND
379SENOR
227SENORA
192SENORES
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240SENZA
429SER
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273SET
715SHALL
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817SHOULD
347SHOUT
274SHOW
266SIDE
357SIDO
492SIEMPRE
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по слову SEMYON

1. Dostoevsky. The Insulted and Injured (English. Униженные и оскорбленные). Part II. Chapter I
Входимость: 1. Размер: 31кб.
Часть текста: his ringing voice rising above our laughter. "They think it's just as usual... that I've come with some nonsense. . . . I say, I've something most interesting to tell you. But will you ever be quiet?" He was extremely anxious to tell his story. One could see from his face that he had important news. But the dignified air he assumed in his naive pride at the possession of such news tickled Natasha at once. I could not help laughing too. And the angrier he was with us the more we laughed. Alyosha's vexation and then childish despair reduced us at last to the condition of Gogol's midshipman who roared with laughter if one held up one's finger. Mavra, coming out of the kitchen, stood in the doorway and looked at us with grave indignation, vexed that Alyosha had not come in for a good "wigging" from Natasha, as she had been eagerly anticipating for the last five days, and that we were all so merry instead. At last Natasha, seeing that our laughter was hurting Alyosha's feelings, left off laughing. "What do you want to tell us?" she asked. "Well, am I to set the samovar?" asked Mavra, interrupting Alyosha without the slightest ceremony. "Be off, Mavra, be off!" he cried, waving his hands at her, in a hurry to get rid of her. "I'm going to tell you everything that has happened, is happening, and is going to happen, because I know all about it. I see, my friends, you want to know where I've been for the last five days - that's what I want to tell you, but you won't let me. To begin with, I've been deceiving you all this time, Natasha, I've been deceiving ...
2. Dostoevsky. Crime and Punishment (English. Преступление и наказание). Part five. Chapter Five
Входимость: 1. Размер: 32кб.
Часть текста: Sonia screamed. "At least it seems so. But... we don't know what to do, you see! She came back- she seems to have been turned out somewhere, perhaps beaten.... So it seems at least,... She had run to your father's former chief, she didn't find him at home: he was dining at some other general's.... Only fancy, she rushed off there, to the other general's, and, imagine, she was so persistent that she managed to get the chief to see her, had him fetched out from dinner, it seems. You can imagine what happened. She was turned out, of course; but, according to her own story, she abused him and threw something at him. One may well believe it.... How it is she wasn't taken up, I can't understand! Now she is telling every one, including Amalia Ivanovna; but it's difficult to understand her, she is screaming and flinging herself about.... Oh yes, she shouts that since every one has abandoned her, she will take the children and go into the street with a barrel-organ, and the children will...
3. Dostoevsky. The Insulted and Injured (English. Униженные и оскорбленные). Part II. Chapter VII
Входимость: 1. Размер: 15кб.
Часть текста: at the same time an extreme slovenliness. The door was opened by a very pretty girl of nineteen, plainly but charmingly dressed, clean, and with very good-natured, merry eyes. I guessed at once that this was the Alexandra Semyonovna to whom he had made passing allusion that morning, holding out an introduction to her as an allurement to me. She asked who I was, and hearing my name said that Masloboev was expecting me, but that he was asleep now in his room, to which she took me. Masloboev was asleep on a very good soft sofa with his dirty great-coat over him, and a shabby leather pillow under his head. He was sleeping very lightly. As soon as we went in he called me by my name. "Ah, that was you? I was expecting you. I was just dreaming you'd come in and wake me. So it's time. Come along." "Where are we going? "To see a lady." "What lady? Why?" "Mme. Bubnov, to pay her out. Isn't she a beauty?" he drawled, turning to Alexandra Semyonovna, and he positively kissed his finger-tips at the thought of Mme. Bubnov. "Get along, you're making it up!" said Alexandra Semyon- ovna, feeling it incumbent on her to make a show of anger. "Don't you know her? Let me introduce you, old man. Here, Alexandra Semyonovna, let me present to you a literary general; it's only once a year he's on view for nothing, at other times you have to pay." "Here he is up to his nonsense...
4. Dostoevsky. Crime and Punishment (English. Преступление и наказание). Part two. Chapter Seven
Входимость: 5. Размер: 43кб.
Часть текста: ELEGANT carriage stood in the middle of the road with a pair of spirited grey horses; there was no one in it, and the coachman had got off his box and stood by; the horses were being held by the bridle... A mass of people had gathered round, the police standing in front. One of them held a lighted lantern which he was turning on something lying close to the wheels. Every one was talking, shouting, exclaiming; the coachman seemed at a loss and kept repeating: "What a misfortune! Good Lord, what a misfortune!" Raskolnikov pushed his way in as far as he could, and succeeded at last in seeing the object of the commotion and interest. On the ground a man who had been run over lay apparently unconscious, and covered with blood; he was very badly dressed, but not like a workman. Blood was flowing from his head and face; his face was crushed, mutilated and disfigured. He was evidently badly injured. "Merciful heaven!" wailed the coachman, "what more could I do? If I'd been driving fast or had not shouted to him, but I was going quietly, not in a hurry. Every one could see I was going along just like everybody else. A drunken man can't walk straight, we all know.... I saw him crossing the street, staggering and almost falling. I shouted again and a second and a third time, then I held the horses in,...
5. Dostoevsky. The Double (English. Двойник). Chapter VI
Входимость: 2. Размер: 30кб.
Часть текста: at the same time it was all so strange, incomprehensible, wild, it seemed so impossible, that it was really hard to credit the whole business; Mr. Golyadkin was, indeed, ready to admit himself that it was all an incredible delusion, a passing aberration of the fancy, a darkening of the mind, if he had not fortunately known by bitter experience to what lengths spite will sometimes carry any one, what a pitch of ferocity an enemy may reach when he is bent on revenging his honour and prestige. Besides, Mr. Golyadkin's exhausted limbs, his heavy head, his aching back, and the malignant cold in his head bore vivid witness to the probability of his expedition of the previous night and upheld the reality of it, and to some extent of all that had happened during that expedition. And, indeed, Mr. Golyadkin had known long, long before that something was being got up among them, that there was some one else with them. But after all, thinking it over thoroughly, he made up his mind to keep quiet, to submit and not to protest for the time. "They are simply plotting to frighten me, perhaps, and when they see that I don't mind, that I make no protest, but keep perfectly quiet and put up with it meekly, they'll give it up, they'll give it up of themselves, give it up of their own accord." Such, then, were the thoughts in the mind of Mr. Golyadkin as, stretching in his bed,...

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