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Показаны лучшие 100 слов (из 438).
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62WAIL
432WAIT
72WAKE
79WAKED
416WALK
176WALL
73WANDER
643WANT
292WANTED
78WARM
83WARMLY
67WARN
8071WAS
126WASN
172WATCH
72WATCHED
176WATER
52WAVED
726WAY
116WEAK
62WEAKNESS
67WEAR
79WEARING
52WEARY
93WEDDING
117WEEK
82WEEKS
135WEEP
995WELL
804WENT
74WEPT
1876WERE
81WET
134WHATEVER
52WHEEL
1292WHEN
66WHENEVER
284WHETHER
1307WHICH
385WHILE
50WHIRL
234WHISPER
136WHITE
527WHOLE
341WHOM
130WHOSE
1097WHY
74WICKED
83WIDE
119WIDOW
358WIFE
82WILD
1982WILL
89WIN
72WIND
264WINDOW
92WINDOWS
114WINE
68WINTER
280WISH
77WIT
4654WITH
110WITHIN
756WITHOUT
98WITNESS
96WITNESSES
627WOMAN
188WOMEN
520WON
153WONDER
66WONDERFUL
66WONDERING
66WOOD
64WOODEN
815WORD
66WORE
319WORK
67WORKED
65WORKING
325WORLD
65WORN
71WORRIED
82WORRY
134WORSE
83WORST
145WORTH
56WORTHLESS
66WORTHY
1716WOULD
187WOULDN
61WOUNDED
56WRATH
62WRETCH
100WRETCHED
274WRITE
60WRITER
116WRITING
174WRITTEN
145WRONG
140WROTE

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по слову WRING

1. Dostoevsky. The Idiot (English. Идиот). Part III. Chapter X
Входимость: 1. Размер: 16кб.
Часть текста: tears sparkling on her long lashes, and beckoned him after her; and again he awoke, as before, with the picture of her face haunting him. He longed to get up and go to her at once--but he COULD NOT. At length, almost in despair, he unfolded the letters, and began to read them. These letters, too, were like a dream. We sometimes have strange, impossible dreams, contrary to all the laws of nature. When we awake we remember them and wonder at their strangeness. You remember, perhaps, that you were in full possession of your reason during this succession of fantastic images; even that you acted with extraordinary logic and cunning while surrounded by murderers who hid their intentions and made great demonstrations of friendship, while waiting for an opportunity to cut your throat. You remember how you escaped them by some ingenious stratagem; then you doubted if they were really deceived, or whether they were only pretending not to know your hiding-place; then you thought of another plan and hoodwinked them once again. You remember all this quite clearly, but how is it that your reason calmly accepted all the manifest absurdities and impossibilities that crowded into your dream? One of the murderers suddenly changed into a woman before your very eyes; then the woman was transformed into a hideous, cunning little dwarf; and you believed it, and accepted it all almost as a matter of course--while at the same time your intelligence seemed unusually keen, and accomplished miracles of cunning, sagacity, and logic! Why is it that when you awake to the world of realities you nearly always feel, sometimes very vividly, that the vanished dream has carried with it some enigma which you have failed to solve? You smile at the extravagance of your dream, and yet you feel that this tissue of absurdity contained some real idea, something that belongs to your true life,--something that exists, and has always existed, in your heart. You search your dream for some prophecy...
2. Dostoevsky. The Insulted and Injured (English. Униженные и оскорбленные). Part II. Chapter V
Входимость: 1. Размер: 20кб.
Часть текста: as he said it. "Come, Masloboev,, old boy, you're talking nonsense!" I interrupted. "Generals look very different from me even if they are literary ones, and besides, let me tell you, I certainly do remember having met you twice in the street. But you obviously. avoided me. And why should I go up to a man if I see he's trying to avoid me? And do you know what I believe? If you weren't drunk you wouldn't have called to me even now. That's true, isn't it? Well, how are you? I'm very, very glad to have met you, my boy." "Really? And I'm not compromising you by my. . . 'unconventional' appearance? But there's no need to ask that. It's not a great matter; I always remember what a jolly chap you were, old Vanya. Do you remember you took a thrashing for me? You held your tongue and didn't give me away, and, instead of being grateful, I jeered at you for a week afterwards. You're a blessed innocent! Glad to see you, my dear soul!" (We kissed each other.) "How many years I've been pining in solitude - 'From morn till night, from dark till light but I've not forgotten old times. They're not easy to forget. But what have you been doing, what have you been doing?" "I? Why, I'm...
3. Dostoevsky. A Raw Youth (English. Подросток). Part III. Chapter XII
Входимость: 1. Размер: 39кб.
Часть текста: last I found Tatyana Pavlovna at home! I at once explained everything to her--all about the "document," and every detail of what was going on at my lodgings. Though she quite understood the position, and might have fully grasped what was happening in two words, yet the explanation took us, I believe, some ten minutes. I did the talking, I put aside all shame and told her the whole truth. She sat in her chair silent and immovable, drawing herself up straight as a knitting needle, with her lips compressed, and her eyes fixed upon me, listening greedily. But when I finished she promptly jumped up from her chair, and with such impetuosity that I jumped up too. "Ach, you puppy! So you really had that letter sewn up in your pocket and it was sewn up there by that fool Marya Ivanovna! Oh, you shameless villains! So you came here to conquer hearts and take the fashionable world by storm. You wanted to revenge yourself on the devil knows who, because you're an illegitimate son, eh?" "Tatyana Pavlovna, don't dare to abuse me!" I cried. "Perhaps you in your abuse have been the cause from the very beginning of my vindictiveness here. Yes, I am an illegitimate son, and perhaps I worked to revenge myself for being an illegitimate son, and perhaps I did want to revenge myself on the devil knows who, the...
4. Dostoevsky. The Brothers Karamazov (English. Братья Карамазовы). Part I. Book III. The Sensualists. Chapter 10. Both Together
Входимость: 1. Размер: 28кб.
Часть текста: the fatal, insoluble question: How would things end between his father and his brother Dmitri with this terrible woman? Now he had himself been a witness of it, he had been present and seen them face to face. Yet only his brother Dmitri could be made unhappy, terribly, completely unhappy: there was trouble awaiting him. It appeared too that there were other people concerned, far more so than Alyosha could have supposed before. There was something positively mysterious in it, too. Ivan had made a step towards him, which was what Alyosha had been long desiring. Yet now he felt for some reason that he was frightened at it. And these women? Strange to say, that morning he had set out for Katerina Ivanovna's in the greatest embarrassment; now he felt nothing of the kind. On the contrary, he was hastening there as though expecting to find guidance from her. Yet to give her this message was obviously more difficult than before. The matter of the three thousand was decided irrevocably, and Dmitri, feeling himself dishonoured and losing his last hope, might sink to any depth. He had, moreover, told him to describe to Katerina Ivanovna the scene which had just taken place with his father. It was by now seven o'clock,...
5. Dostoevsky. The Brothers Karamazov (English. Братья Карамазовы). Part II. Book VI. The Russian Monk. Chapter 1. Father Zossima and His Visitors
Входимость: 1. Размер: 36кб.
Часть текста: once more with those dear to his heart." This promise and indeed every word of the dying elder Father Paissy put implicit trust in. If he had seen him unconscious, if he had seen him breathe his last, and yet had his promise that he would rise up and say good-bye to him, he would not have believed perhaps even in death, but would still have expected the dead man to recover and fulfil his promise. In the morning as he lay down to sleep, Father Zossima had told him positively: "I shall not die without the delight of another conversation with you, beloved of my heart. I shall look once more on your dear face and pour out my heart to you once again." The monks, who had gathered for this probably last conversation with Father Zossima, had all been his devoted friends for many years. There were four of them: Father Iosif and Father Paissy, Father Mihail the warden of the hermitage, a man not very old and far from being learned. He was of humble origin, of strong will and steadfast faith, of austere appearance, but of deep tenderness, though he obviously concealed it as though he were almost ashamed of it. The fourth, Father Anfim, was a very old and humble little monk of the poorest peasant class. He was almost illiterate, and very quiet, scarcely speaking to anyone. He was the humblest of the humble, and looked as though he had been frightened by something great and awful beyond the scope of his...

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