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Показаны лучшие 100 слов (из 438).
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62WAIL
432WAIT
72WAKE
79WAKED
416WALK
176WALL
73WANDER
643WANT
292WANTED
78WARM
83WARMLY
67WARN
8071WAS
126WASN
172WATCH
72WATCHED
176WATER
52WAVED
726WAY
116WEAK
62WEAKNESS
67WEAR
79WEARING
52WEARY
93WEDDING
117WEEK
82WEEKS
135WEEP
995WELL
804WENT
74WEPT
1876WERE
81WET
134WHATEVER
52WHEEL
1292WHEN
66WHENEVER
284WHETHER
1307WHICH
385WHILE
50WHIRL
234WHISPER
136WHITE
527WHOLE
341WHOM
130WHOSE
1097WHY
74WICKED
83WIDE
119WIDOW
358WIFE
82WILD
1982WILL
89WIN
72WIND
264WINDOW
92WINDOWS
114WINE
68WINTER
280WISH
77WIT
4654WITH
110WITHIN
756WITHOUT
98WITNESS
96WITNESSES
627WOMAN
188WOMEN
520WON
153WONDER
66WONDERFUL
66WONDERING
66WOOD
64WOODEN
815WORD
66WORE
319WORK
67WORKED
65WORKING
325WORLD
65WORN
71WORRIED
82WORRY
134WORSE
83WORST
145WORTH
56WORTHLESS
66WORTHY
1716WOULD
187WOULDN
61WOUNDED
56WRATH
62WRETCH
100WRETCHED
274WRITE
60WRITER
116WRITING
174WRITTEN
145WRONG
140WROTE

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1. Dostoevsky. Crime and Punishment (English. Преступление и наказание). Part six. Chapter Three
Входимость: 8. Размер: 23кб.
Часть текста: to it, that he had not. He pondered again and again, went over Porfiry's visit; no, he hadn't been, of course he hadn't. But if he had not been yet, would he go? Meanwhile, for the present he fancied he couldn't. Why? He could not have explained, but if he could, he would not have wasted much thought over it at the moment. It all worried him and at the same time he could not attend to it. Strange to say, none would have believed it perhaps, but he only felt a faint vague anxiety about his immediate future. Another, much more important anxiety tormented him- it concerned himself, but in a different, more vital way. Moreover, he was conscious of immense moral fatigue, though his mind was working better that morning than it had done of late. And was it worth while, after all that had happened, to contend with these new trivial difficulties? Was it worth while, for instance, to manoeuvre that Svidrigailov should not go to Porfiry's? Was it worth while to investigate, to ascertain the facts, to waste time over any one like Svidrigailov? Oh how sick he was of it all! And yet he was hastening to Svidrigailov; could he be expecting something new from him, information, or means of escape? Men will catch at straws! Was it destiny or some instinct bringing them together? Perhaps it was only fatigue, despair; perhaps it was not Svidrigailov but some other whom he needed, and Svidrigailov had simply presented himself by chance. Sonia? But what should he go to Sonia for now? To beg her tears again? He was afraid of Sonia, too. Sonia stood before him as an irrevocable sentence. He must go his own way or hers. At that moment especially he did not feel equal to seeing her. No, would it not be better to try Svidrigailov? And he could not help inwardly owning that he had long felt that he must see him for some reason. But what could they have in common? Their very evil-doing could not be of the same kind. The man, moreover, was very unpleasant, evidently depraved, undoubtedly...
2. Dostoevsky. The Brothers Karamazov (English. Братья Карамазовы). Part III. Book VII. Alyosha. Chapter 3.An Onion
Входимость: 12. Размер: 46кб.
Часть текста: in placing his "favourite" with the widow Morozov was that the old woman should keep a sharp eye on her new lodger's conduct. But this sharp eye soon proved to be unnecessary, and in the end the widow Morozov seldom met Grushenka and did not worry her by looking after her in any way. It is true that four years had passed since the old man had brought the slim, delicate, shy, timid, dreamy, and sad girl of eighteen from the chief town of the province, and much had happened since then. Little was known of the girl's history in the town and that little was vague. Nothing more had been learnt during the last four years, even after many persons had become interested in the beautiful young woman into whom Agrafena Alexandrovna had meanwhile developed. There were rumours that she had been at seventeen betrayed by someone, some sort of officer, and immediately afterwards abandoned by him. The officer had gone away and afterwards married, while Grushenka had been left in poverty and disgrace. It was said, however, that though Grushenka had been raised from destitution by the old man, Samsonov, she came of a respectable family belonging to the clerical class, that she was the daughter of a deacon or something of the sort. And now after four years the sensitive, injured and pathetic little orphan had become a plump, rosy beauty of the Russian type, a woman of bold and determined character, proud and insolent. She had a good head for business, was acquisitive,...
3. Dostoevsky. A Raw Youth (English. Подросток). Part I. Chapter VII
Входимость: 9. Размер: 35кб.
Часть текста: at all. Probably all this was because I had anyway broken my chains and for the first time felt myself free. I felt, too, that I had weakened my position: how I was to act in regard to the letter about the inheritance was more obscure than ever. Now it would be certainly taken for granted that I was revenging myself on Versilov. But while all this discussion was going on downstairs I had made up my mind to submit the question of the letter to an impartial outsider and to appeal to Vassin for his decision, or, failing Vassin, to take it to some one else. I had already made up my mind to whom. I would go to see Vassin once, for that occasion only, I thought to myself, and then--then I would vanish for a long while, for some months, from the sight of all, especially of Vassin. Only my mother and sister I might see occasionally. It was all inconsistent and confused; I felt that I had done something, though not in the right way, and I was satisfied: I repeat, I was awfully pleased anyway. I meant to go to bed rather early, foreseeing I should have a lot to do next day. Besides finding a lodging and moving, I had another project which in one way or another I meant to carry out. But the evening was not destined to end without surprises, and Versilov succeeded in astonishing me extremely. He had certainly never been into my attic, and lo and behold, before I had been an hour in my room I heard his footsteps on the ladder: he called to me to show a light. I took a candle, and stretching out my hand, which he caught hold of, I helped him up. "Merci, my dear fellow; I've never climbed up here before, not even when I took the lodgings. I imagined what...
4. Dostoevsky. The Brothers Karamazov (English. Братья Карамазовы). Part IV. Book XI. Ivan. Chapter 3. A Little Demon
Входимость: 13. Размер: 17кб.
Часть текста: Alyosha. "I've been listening. Why do you stare at me? I want to listen and I do listen, there's no harm in that. I don't apologise." "You are upset about something?" "On the contrary, I am very happy. I've only just been reflecting for the thirtieth time what a good thing it is I refused you and shall not be your wife. You are not fit to be a husband. If I were to marry you and give you a note to take to the man I loved after you, you'd take it and be sure to give it to him and bring an answer back, too. If you were forty, you would still go on taking my love-letters for me." She suddenly laughed. "There is something spiteful and yet open-hearted about you," Alyosha smiled to her. "The open-heartedness consists in my not being ashamed of myself with you. What's more, I don't want to feel ashamed with you, just with you. Alyosha, why is it I don't respect you? I am very fond of you, but I don't respect you. If I respected you, I shouldn't talk to you without shame, should I?" "No." "But do you believe that I am not ashamed with you?" "No, I don't believe it." Lise laughed nervously again; she spoke rapidly. "I sent your brother, Dmitri Fyodorovitch, some sweets in prison. Alyosha, you know, you are quite pretty! I...
5. Dostoevsky. The Insulted and Injured (English. Униженные и оскорбленные). Part III. Chapter VI
Входимость: 12. Размер: 30кб.
Часть текста: The tea-table glittered with crystal, silver and china. On another table, which was covered with a tablecloth of a different kind, but no less gorgeous, stood plates of excellent sweets, Kiev preserves both dried and liquid, fruit-paste, jelly, French preserves, oranges, apples, and three or four sorts of nuts; in fact, a regular fruit-shop. On a third table, covered with a snow-white cloth, there were savouries of different sorts - caviar, cheese, a pie, sausage, smoked ham, fish and a row of fine glass decanters containing spirits of many sorts, and of the most attractive colours - green, ruby, brown and gold. Finally on a little table on one side - also covered with a white cloth - there were two bottles of champagne. On a table before the sofa there were three bottles containing Sauterne, Lafitte, and Cognac, very expensive brands from Eliseyev's. Alexandra Semyonovna was sitting at the tea-table, and though her dress and general get-up was simple, they had evidently been the subject of thought and attention, and the result was indeed very successful. She knew what suited her, and evidently took pride in it. She got up to meet me with some ceremony. Her fresh little face beamed with pleasure and satisfaction. Maslo- boev was wearing gorgeous Chinese slippers, a sumptuous dressing- gown, and dainty clean linen. Fashionable studs and buttons were conspicuous on his shirt everywhere where...

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