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60OBEY
197OBJECT
79OBJETO
55OBJETOS
61OBLIGADO
47OBLIGATION
62OBLIGED
77OBRA
66OBRAR
37OBSCURE
51OBSERVACION
56OBSERVAR
44OBSERVATION
93OBSERVE
218OBSERVED
78OBSERVO
62OBTAIN
39OBVIOUS
86OBVIOUSLY
86OCASION
163OCCASION
139OCCHI
59OCCUPIED
33OCCUR
75OCCURRED
91OCHO
84OCURRE
104OCURRIDO
71OCURRIO
36ODD
99ODIO
64OFENDIDO
618OFF
64OFFENCE
95OFFEND
152OFFER
37OFFERING
151OFFICE
181OFFICER
136OFFICIAL
76OFICIAL
218OFTEN
53OGGI
147OGNI
163OIDO
63OIGA
88OIR
424OJOS
991OLD
44OLIA
101OLVIDADO
940ONCE
2547ONE
70ONESELF
1566ONLY
295OPEN
210OPENED
57OPENING
89OPENLY
219OPINION
66OPPORTUNITY
33OPPOSED
94OPPOSITE
32OPPRESS
274ORA
85ORDEN
213ORDER
73ORDERED
88ORDINARY
81ORGULLO
56ORGULLOSO
88ORIGINAL
71ORMAI
164ORO
82ORPHAN
54OSCURIDAD
688OTHER
66OTHERWISE
455OTRA
119OTRAS
343OTRO
174OTROS
229OUGHT
1003OUR
86OURSELVES
1875OUT
55OUTBURST
71OUTSIDE
698OVER
65OVERCOAT
67OVERCOME
34OVERLOOK
72OVERWHELM
46OVERWHELMING
35OWE
67OWING
567OWN
38OWNER
117OYE
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по слову OCCUPY

1. Dostoevsky. The Idiot (English. Идиот). Part IV. Chapter IV
Входимость: 1. Размер: 30кб.
Часть текста: saw that the general was quite a different man from what he had been the day before; he looked like one who had come to some momentous resolve. His calmness, however, was more apparent than real. He was courteous, but there was a suggestion of injured innocence in his manner. "I've brought your book back," he began, indicating a book lying on the table. "Much obliged to you for lending it to me." "Ah, yes. Well, did you read it, general? It's curious, isn't it?" said the prince, delighted to be able to open up conversation upon an outside subject. "Curious enough, yes, but crude, and of course dreadful nonsense; probably the man lies in every other sentence." The general spoke with considerable confidence, and dragged his words out with a conceited drawl. "Oh, but it's only the simple tale of an old soldier who saw the French enter Moscow. Some of his remarks were wonderfully interesting. Remarks of an eye-witness are always valuable, whoever he be, don't you think so "Had I been the publisher I should not have printed it. As to the evidence of eye-witnesses, in these days people prefer impudent lies to the stories of men of worth and long service. I know of some notes of the year 1812, which--I have determined, prince, to leave this house, Mr. Lebedeff's house." The general looked significantly at his host. "Of course you have your own lodging at Pavlofsk at--at your daughter's house," began the prince, quite at a loss what to say. He suddenly recollected that the general had come for advice on a most important matter, affecting his destiny. "At my wife's; in other words, at my own place, my daughter's house." "I beg your pardon, I--" "I leave Lebedeff's house, my dear prince, because I have quarrelled with this person. I broke with him last night, and am very sorry that I did not do so before. I expect respect, prince, even from those to...
2. Dostoevsky. The Possessed (English. Бесы). Part II. Chapter V. On the eve op the fete
Входимость: 1. Размер: 60кб.
Часть текста: a little clerk, Lyamshin, who used at one time to visit Stepan Trofimovitch, and had suddenly found favour in the governor's house for the way he played the piano and now was of use running errands. Liputin was there a good deal too, and Yulia Mihailovna destined him to be the editor of a new independent provincial paper. There were also several ladies, married and single, and lastly, even Karmazinov who, though he could not be said to bustle, announced aloud with a complacent air that he would agreeably astonish every one when the literary quadrille began. An extraordinary multitude of donors and subscribers had turned up, all the select society of the town; but even the unselect were admitted, if only they produced the cash. Yulia Mihailovna observed that sometimes it was a positive duty to allow the mixing of classes, “for otherwise who is to enlighten them?” A private drawing-room committee was formed, at which it was decided that the fete was to be of a democratic character. The enormous list of subscriptions tempted them to lavish expenditure. They wanted to do something on a marvellous scale—that's why it was put off. They were still undecided where the ball was to take place, whether in the immense house belonging to the marshal's wife, which she was willing to give up to them for the day, or at Varvara Petrovna's mansion at Skvoreshniki. It was rather a distance to Skvoreshniki, but many of the committee were of opinion that it would be “freer” there. Varvara Petrovna would dearly have liked it to have been in her house. It's difficult to understand why this proud woman seemed almost making up to Yulia Mihailovna. Probably what pleased her was that the latter in her turn seemed almost fawning upon Nikolay Vsyevolodovitch and was more gracious to him than to anyone. I repeat again that Pyotr Stepanovitch was always, in continual whispers, strengthening in the governor's household an idea he had...
3. Dostoevsky. Poor Folk (English. Бедные люди). Page 3
Входимость: 1. Размер: 45кб.
Часть текста: Islands yesterday, Makar Alexievitch! How fresh and pleasant, how full of verdure, was everything! And I had not seen anything green for such a long time! During my illness I used to think that I should never get better, that I was certainly going to die. Judge, then, how I felt yesterday! True, I may have seemed to you a little sad, and you must not be angry with me for that. Happy and light-hearted though I was, there were moments, even at the height of my felicity, when, for some unknown reason, depression came sweeping over my soul. I kept weeping about trifles, yet could not say why I was grieved. The truth is that I am unwell--so much so, that I look at everything from the gloomy point of view. The pale, clear sky, the setting sun, the evening stillness--ah, somehow I felt disposed to grieve and feel hurt at these things; my heart seemed to be over-charged, and to be calling for tears to relieve it. But why should I write this to you? It is difficult for my heart to express itself; still more difficult for it to forego self- expression. Yet possibly you may understand me. Tears and laughter! . . . How good you are, Makar...
4. Dostoevsky. The Gambler (English. Игрок). Chapter X
Входимость: 1. Размер: 31кб.
Часть текста: however, our landlord, for some reason or another, allotted such a sumptuous suite that he fairly overreached himself; for he assigned her a suite consisting of four magnificently appointed rooms, with bathroom, servants' quarters, a separate room for her maid, and so on. In fact, during the previous week the suite had been occupied by no less a personage than a Grand Duchess: which circumstance was duly explained to the new occupant, as an excuse for raising the price of these apartments. The Grandmother had herself carried-- or, rather, wheeled--through each room in turn, in order that she might subject the whole to a close and attentive scrutiny; while the landlord--an elderly, bald-headed man--walked respectfully by her side. What every one took the Grandmother to be I do not know, but it appeared, at least, that she was accounted a person not only of great importance, but also, and still more, of great wealth; and without delay they entered her in the hotel register as "Madame la Generale, Princesse de Tarassevitcheva," although she had never been a princess in her life. Her retinue, her reserved compartment in the train, her pile of unnecessary trunks, portmanteaux, and strong-boxes, all helped to increase her prestige; while her wheeled chair, her sharp tone and voice, her eccentric questions (put with an air of the most overbearing and unbridled...
5. Dostoevsky. The Possessed (English. Бесы). Part II. Chapter VII. A meeting
Входимость: 1. Размер: 59кб.
Часть текста: and by no means very poor, he somehow seemed to every one an eccentric fellow who was fond of solitude, and, what's more, “stuck up in conversation.” Madame Virginsky was a midwife by profession—and by that very fact was on the lowest rung of the social ladder, lower even than the priest's wife in spite of her husband's rank as an officer. But she was conspicuously lacking in the humility befitting her position. And after her very stupid and unpardonably open liaison on principle with Captain Lebyadkin, a notorious rogue, even the most indulgent of our ladies turned away from her with marked contempt. But Madame Virginsky accepted all this as though it were what she wanted. It is remarkable that those very ladies applied to Arina Prohorovna (that is, Madame Virginsky) when they were in an interesting condition, rather than to any one of the other three accoucheuses of the town. She was sent for even by country families living in the neighbourhood, so great was the belief in her knowledge, luck, and skill in critical cases. It ended in her practising only among the wealthiest ladies; she was greedy of money. Feeling her power to the full, she ended by not putting herself out for anyone. Possibly on purpose,...

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