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60OBEY
197OBJECT
79OBJETO
55OBJETOS
61OBLIGADO
47OBLIGATION
62OBLIGED
77OBRA
66OBRAR
37OBSCURE
51OBSERVACION
56OBSERVAR
44OBSERVATION
93OBSERVE
218OBSERVED
78OBSERVO
62OBTAIN
39OBVIOUS
86OBVIOUSLY
86OCASION
163OCCASION
139OCCHI
59OCCUPIED
33OCCUR
75OCCURRED
91OCHO
84OCURRE
104OCURRIDO
71OCURRIO
36ODD
99ODIO
64OFENDIDO
618OFF
64OFFENCE
95OFFEND
152OFFER
37OFFERING
151OFFICE
181OFFICER
136OFFICIAL
76OFICIAL
218OFTEN
53OGGI
147OGNI
163OIDO
63OIGA
88OIR
424OJOS
991OLD
44OLIA
101OLVIDADO
940ONCE
2547ONE
70ONESELF
1566ONLY
295OPEN
210OPENED
57OPENING
89OPENLY
219OPINION
66OPPORTUNITY
33OPPOSED
94OPPOSITE
32OPPRESS
274ORA
85ORDEN
213ORDER
73ORDERED
88ORDINARY
81ORGULLO
56ORGULLOSO
88ORIGINAL
71ORMAI
164ORO
82ORPHAN
54OSCURIDAD
688OTHER
66OTHERWISE
455OTRA
119OTRAS
343OTRO
174OTROS
229OUGHT
1003OUR
86OURSELVES
1875OUT
55OUTBURST
71OUTSIDE
698OVER
65OVERCOAT
67OVERCOME
34OVERLOOK
72OVERWHELM
46OVERWHELMING
35OWE
67OWING
567OWN
38OWNER
117OYE
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по слову OVERPOWER

1. Dostoevsky. The Insulted and Injured (English. Униженные и оскорбленные)
Входимость: 1. Размер: 26кб.
Часть текста: had been meaning to move, but I had hung on till the spring. I had not been able to find anything decent all day. In the first place I wanted a separate tenement, not a room in other people's lodgings; secondly, though I could do with one room, it must be a large one, and, of course, it had at the same time to be as cheap as possible. I have observed that in a confined space even thought is cramped; When I was brooding over a future novel I liked to walk up and down the room. By the way, I always like better brooding over my works and dreaming how they should be written than actually writing them. And this really is not from laziness. Why is it? I had been feeling unwell all day, and towards sunset I felt really very ill. Something like a fever set in. Moreover, I had been all day long on my legs and was tired. Towards evening, just before it got dark, I was walking along the Voznesensky Prospect. I love the March sun in Petersburg, especially at sunset, in clear frosty weather, of course. The whole street suddenly glitters, bathed in brilliant light. All the houses seem suddenly, as it were, to sparkle. Their grey, yellow, and dirty- green hues for an instant lose all their gloominess, it is as though there were a sudden clearness in one's soul, as though one were...
2. Dostoevsky. A Raw Youth (English. Подросток). Part I. Chapter IX
Входимость: 1. Размер: 59кб.
Часть текста: to such women too--it would be truer to say such a woman, for I was not considering Tatyana Pavlovna. Perhaps it's out of the question to say to a woman of that class that one spits on her intrigues, but I had said that, and it was just that that I was pleased with. Apart from anything else, I was convinced that by taking this tone I had effaced all that was ridiculous in my position. But I had not time to think much about that: my mind was full of Kraft. Not that the thought of him distressed me very greatly, but yet I was shaken to my inmost depths, and so much so that the ordinary human feeling of pleasure at another man's misfortune--at his breaking his leg or covering himself with disgrace, at his losing some one dear to him, and so on--even this ordinary feeling of mean satisfaction was completely eclipsed by another absolutely single- hearted feeling, a feeling of sorrow, of compassion for Kraft--at least I don't know whether it was compassion, but it was a strong and warm-hearted feeling. And I was glad of this too. It's marvellous how many irrelevant ideas can flash through the mind at the very time when one is shattered by some tremendous piece of news, which one would have thought must overpower all other feelings and banish all extraneous thoughts, especially...
3. Dostoevsky. The Idiot (English. Идиот). Part II. Chapter IX
Входимость: 1. Размер: 31кб.
Часть текста: truth in order to strengthen your claim, and to serve your interests. Mr. Keller said that he previously consulted you about his article in the paper, but did not read it to you as a whole. Certainly he could not have read that passage. .. . . "As a matter of fact, I did not read it," interrupted the boxer, "but its contents had been given me on unimpeachable authority, and I. . ." "Excuse me, Mr. Keller," interposed Gavrila Ardalionovitch. "Allow me to speak. I assure you your article shall be mentioned in its proper place, and you can then explain everything, but for the moment I would rather not anticipate. Quite accidentally, with the help of my sister, Varvara Ardalionovna Ptitsin, I obtained from one of her intimate friends, Madame Zoubkoff, a letter written to her twenty-five years ago, by Nicolai Andreevitch Pavlicheff, then abroad. After getting into communication with this lady, I went by her advice to Timofei Fedorovitch Viazovkin, a retired colonel, and one of Pavlicheff's oldest friends. He gave me two more letters written by the latter when he was still in foreign parts. These three documents, their dates, and the facts mentioned in them, prove in the most undeniable manner, that eighteen months before your birth, Nicolai Andreevitch went abroad, where he remained for three consecutive years. Your mother, as you are well aware, has never been out of Russia. . . . It is too late to read ...
4. Dostoevsky. The Double (English. Двойник). Chapter VIII
Входимость: 1. Размер: 32кб.
Часть текста: it mean?" Mr. Golyadkin almost shrieked. "What can it be? What does this new circumstance portend?" While Mr. Golyadkin was gazing in open-mouthed bewilderment at the empty spot, the door creaked and Petrushka came in with the tea-tray. "Where, where?" our hero said in a voice hardly audible, pointing to the place which had ben occupied by his visitor the night before. At first Petrushka made no answer and did not look at his master, but fixed his eyes upon the corner to the right till Mr. Golyadkin felt compelled to look into that corner too. After a brief silence, however, Petrushka in a rude and husky voice answered that his master was not at home. "You idiot; why I'm your master, Petrushka!" said Mr. Golyadkin in a breaking voice, looking open-eyed a his servant. Petrushka made no reply, but he gave Mr. Golyadkin such a look that the latter crimsoned to his ears - looked at hm with an insulting reproachfulness almost equivalent to open abuse. Mr. Golyadkin was utterly flabbergasted, as the saying is. At last...
5. Dostoevsky. The Brothers Karamazov (English. Братья Карамазовы). Part IV. Book XII. A Judicial Error. Chapter 5.A Sudden Catastrophe
Входимость: 1. Размер: 25кб.
Часть текста: Карамазовы). Part IV. Book XII. A Judicial Error. Chapter 5.A Sudden Catastrophe Chapter 5 A Sudden Catastrophe I MAY note that he had been called before Alyosha. But the usher of the court announced to the President that, owing to an attack of illness or some sort of fit, the witness could not appear at the moment, but was ready to give his evidence as soon as he recovered. But no one seemed to have heard it and it only came out later. His entrance was for the first moment almost unnoticed. The principal witnesses, especially the two rival ladies, had already been questioned. Curiosity was satisfied for the time; the public was feeling almost fatigued. Several more witnesses were still to be heard, who probably had little information to give after all that had been given. Time was passing. Ivan walked up with extraordinary slowness, looking at no one, and with his head bowed, as though plunged in gloomy thought. He was irreproachably dressed, but his face made a painful impression, on me at least: there was an earthy look in it, a look like a dying man's. His eyes were lustreless; he raised them and looked slowly round the court. Alyosha jumped up from his seat and moaned "Ah!" I remember that, but it was hardly noticed. The President began by informing him that he was a witness not on oath, that he might answer or refuse to answer, but that, of course, he must bear witness according to his conscience, and so on, and so on. Ivan listened and looked at him blankly, but his face gradually relaxed into a smile, and as soon as the President, looking at him in astonishment, finished, he laughed outright. "Well, and what else?" he asked in a loud voice. There was a hush in the court;...

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